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THE PITFALLS REVEALED WHICH CARRIES THE MOST CLOUT?


light is not working as it should, or the meter is faulty, maybe there’s even a scratch on the bodywork which exceeds local authority limits, the vehicle could be suspended during this inspection. However, these are NOT roadworthiness issues; these are nothing more than breaches of local authority conditions (compliance).


The number of licensing authorities that actually knew about and declared that they held the appropriate certification in order to comply with the V112 exemption, could be counted on one hand!!


Of course, there were many local authorities that did not respond at all, which meant we could not publish a detailed national table on the topic.


But why is this important? If we are exempt, then we are legal - right?


OK, the first two aspects are more of an inconvenience than anything else since there are two downsides to not having an actual roadworthiness or MoT test certificate.


• The vehicle cannot be taxed online (after it is three years old of course), since a vehicle can be taxed without a valid MoT until its third birthday, which means printing off and completing the above exemption form (V112) and taking it to the local post office to tax the vehicle.


• The vehicle will flag up on all ANPR cameras, both on street and in police cars, which could lead to delays whilst answering the questions from the police - who may not be aware that your particular vehicle is subject to the exemption.


This could easily be avoided if the local authorities issued both certificates at the same time.


The third negative impact of relying on a local authority compliance test alone is far more severe and risky, since for this one you could find yourself with your vehicle seized and you being prosecuted.


Where there is no valid MoT for the vehicle, the “exemption” ONLY applies whilst the plates are valid


It is vital that the risks here are understood. During a routine inspection, if the door sticker is faulty, or the roof


MAY 2021


Since you do not have a valid MoT, and the plates are not cur- rent, the vehicle is deemed to be instantly unroadworthy and may NOT be driven away from the site of inspection at all.


What is the solution?


There are a number of options here, some far less likely than others.


1. The Government steps in and makes the compliance test certificate a nationally recognised document that must be uploaded on to the MoT database.


2. The Government abolishes the exemption in order to ensure that all vehicles are shown as being road- worthy to a nationally recognised standard.


3. Local authorities must issue both certificates in order to resolve the risks and reduce inconvenience to drivers/vehicle owners.


Once again, this is an important topic; we have been discussing this at national levels for a long time, in the hope of achieving a result, but we need YOU to support this topic – and to supply your feedback as to your own personal experience.


Remember, any organisation is only as powerful as its membership.


A UNIFIED TRADE IS A POWERFUL VOICE! NOW MORE THAN EVER WE NEED TO STAND TOGETHER!!


JOIN THE NPHTA NOW! 0161 280 2800


info@nphta.co.uk 7


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