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The most common synthetic base oils used in gear oil are Polyalpha olefin (PAO) and Polyalkylene glycol (PAG). Both PAO and PAG have high viscosity indexes, meaning better and more consistent performance across a wide range of operating temperatures compared with mineral oil. They also have better thermal and oxidative resistance, so the oil is less likely to degrade due to high temperature or contamination, and will offer extended drain intervals relative to mineral oil.


Base Oil Types and their industrial uses:


PAG oils are often recommended for worm gear applications, as they are very effective at dispersing the heat generated by the high speeds and friction created when the worm gear teeth mesh.


It’s important to note that PAG oils are not compatible with mineral or PAO oil. If you are changing from one type of product to another, you must do a full clean out and flush of the equipment.


LINK www.millersoils.co.uk


Protecting You and Your Customers


At VLS we investigate and resolve lubricant product complaints concerning incorrect performance claims, misleading technical specifications and products that do not meet OEM or stated industry standards.


To date, we have assessed and actioned 59 cases to ensure open and fair competition for all.


As a result, your customers can be confident that lubricant products are correctly described and can deliver what they claim.


For more information on VLS membership call 01442 875922 or email admin@ukla-vls.org.uk.


www.ukla-vls.org.uk


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