search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
LIVED EXPERIENCE


there were a number of other NHS-backed Recovery Colleges countrywide. She said: “I think people find them a really nurturing space – somewhere they can start to feel like they are reclaiming some of their humanity and individuality. The difference it makes is striking; participants feel really empowered by being seen for their skills and abilities. This helps them get some of their life back, by getting out there and doing things.”


On the DiMHN Conference Group Katharine Lazenby is also on the Design in Mental Health Network’s Conference Group, for the second year running, and has been asked to speak at the 2020 DiMHN conference after her inspiring address last year. She explained: “I haven’t yet written my conference presentation, but am considering something around our experience of ‘safety’ as a service-user in inpatient settings – what it really means to us, and how we can engender the feeling that it is about more than just locks and doors. For example, compassionate treatment, but also a kind of warmth in the environment you can nestle into. Think about the space you might create for yourself when you’re feeling a bit unwell; you want to shroud yourself in a blanket. I’d love to see – in new-build mental healthcare facilities – things like little window seats, or ‘nooks’, where you could retreat to, and where staff wouldn’t worry about you. These would give a sense of being protected by the building.” As our discussion came full circle, Katharine Lazenby reiterated that when confined as an inpatient, one feels ‘like a caged animal’. She said: “That sense of being in a pressure cooker is an unsafe feeling.” One of the ways healthcare providers could counter this was by giving service-users access to outdoor space. She said: “I have seen new designs where patients can have totally free access to the outdoor space; with the ward built around a beautiful garden, they can go out 24 hours a day, without being marshalled by the staff. I thought that was a brilliant design.”


A tricky task


She acknowledged, however, that creating this sort of ‘homely’, non-institutional environment could be ‘tricky when up against standardised care models’. She said: “I don’t know how we overcome this, but perhaps if we can re-shape the environment itself, think more about décor, and about managing patients’ wellbeing in a more person-centered, humane way, we will be on the right path.” She had been delighted to meet former MP and Minister of State for Care and Support, Sir Norman Lamb (a speaker at the event himself, and long-standing advocate of parity of funding for physical and mental healthcare) as a result of attending, and speaking at, the 2019 Design in Mental Health conference. She said: “He invited me to see him at the House of Commons, which I did last Summer.


14


Katharine Lazenby had been delighted to meet former MP and Minister of State for Care and Support, Sir Norman Lamb – a speaker at the event, and long-standing advocate of parity of funding for physical and mental healthcare – at the 2019 Design in Mental Health conference.


“Although he has now stood down as an MP, I know he will continue to strongly champion mental health, and in particular to work to reduce stigma around it and ensure better funding.”


A ‘digital tech’ organisation The former Minister had also invited her to a dinner connected to his appointment to an advisory board for a ‘digital tech’ mental health organisation, XenZone. She explained: “The dinner, in London, brought together mental health and policy reform experts to consider the future of ‘digital tech’ in supporting people with their mental health. Overall, I had an extremely busy 2019, and it’s been interesting how various connections and opportunities have unfolded simply from attending my first Design in Mental Health conference, in 2018. I was later invited to join the DiMHN Conference Group, and then to speak at the 2019 conference. Things have all progressed from there.”


Katharine Lazenby is ‘really passionate’ about speaking at mental health events. She said: “I do feel my life experience perspective is listened to, which is very healing, because it is the opposite of what it’s like to be an inpatient sometimes. Feeling like I have some power and influence has been monumentally important in my recovery journey, and this is why we must think about the factors that facilitate recovery in much broader


Think about the space you might create for yourself when you’re feeling a bit unwell; you want to shroud yourself in a blanket. I’d love to see – in new-build mental healthcare facilities – things like little window seats, or ‘nooks’, where you could retreat to, and where staff wouldn’t worry about you


terms. It’s not just about pills and inpatient care plans, or talking therapy; it’s about finding things that give your life value, purpose, and meaning, in a bigger sense.


Recognising one has a value “We all need that in some way; to feel like we are making a contribution, and I think that is underestimated. In institutions, all those aspects of your identity are stripped away, and it can be really hard to reconnect with them on being discharged back into the community – particularly after long periods in inpatient care.” Rebuilding one’s life following such experience could ‘take a really long time’, as indeed it had for Katharine. She added: “When I started feeling like I could give back, it gave me a bit of a drive to keep myself well, and in fueling my recovery journey.” She didn’t yet, she acknowledged, call herself ‘a recovered person’. “Rather,” she said, “I view myself as somebody managing their wellbeing.”


Training support workers Katharine Lazenby also delivers mental health training to support workers at the Peabody Housing Association in London, in Essex, and East Sussex. Attendees will typically be support workers, managers, and people offering ‘floating support’, i.e. visiting people’s houses, or managing supported housing schemes. She co- delivers courses on ‘Recovery’, ‘Active listening skills’, and ‘Trauma-informed care’.


In fact, she used to live in Peabody supported housing herself. She said: “Interestingly, I have taught a couple of sessions where my former support workers were there as students. That was brilliant, because the last time they saw me I was pretty unwell. It was a really rewarding teaching experience that day, and many said they were really proud of me. I love this work, and indeed am really passionate about teaching and training. It’s also great to have a really positive outlet in different ways.” With that, a very interesting and broad-ranging discussion with this inspiring young lady concluded.


n APRIL 2020 | THE NETWORK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32