search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NUTRITION ▶▶▶


Pig feed formulations for antibiotic-free production


In North America, antibiotic-free pig production causes nutritional challenges. Regulations in Canada are being eased to allow the use of some ingredients already available internationally. An update.


L


ittle is known about the long-term consequences of withdrawing prophylactic antibiotics from pig feed, according to Dr Diana Alessia of the Teagasc Animal and Grassland Research and Innovation Centre in Ire-


The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is in the process of easing some regulato- ry restrictions on feed ingredients.


42 ▶PIG PROGRESS | Volume 36, No. 4, 2020


land. However, Alessia and her colleagues recently found that the removal of these antibiotics is possible with only mi- nor reductions in productive performance and health, which can be addressed by improved husbandry and the use of parenteral antibiotics. Feed is obviously also a critical aspect of successful raised-without-antibiotics (RWA) production. Such feeds have been in development for many years around the world, by companies such as Grand Valley Fortifiers in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada. More than a decade ago, Grand Valley part- nered with Loblaw, one of Canada’s largest food companies, as the feed company liaison between Loblaw and producers contracted to rear pigs for Loblaw’s President’s Choice brand ‘Free From’ pork products. Grand Valley Fortifiers’ monogastric nutritionist Bruce Schu- mann notes that many components of RWA feed – probiot- ics, herbal extracts and more – promote good gut develop- ment and function. “However, because of the difficulty involved in registering novel bacteria in Canada, not much has evolved when it comes to probiotics. It’s a matter of find- ing the best ones that are available in the market and cou- pling them with prebiotics.” Stacie Crowder, lead nutritionist for swine technical innova- tions across Land O’Lakes firms, notes that many additives have emerged and at an increasing rate in the RWA feed space over the past few years, but with limited success. These additives include yeast products, organic acids, en- zymes, phytogenics, flavouring, medium-chained fatty acids and fermentation by-products. Crowder says their approach is to focus on the microbiome,


PHOTO: BART NIJS


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52