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charge is the highest amount of power that users pull in any given month. “The biggest load for a house is probably the clothes


dryer,” he continued. “Your bill is significantly higher in a month you use the dryer just once that created, say, a $90 demand charge. Compared to a month where you didn’t use it and your highest use was the toaster, which uses less power and only created a $30 demand charge in addition to the actual power used.” With electric vehicles, there could be hundreds of


kilowatts of demand charges, adding up to thousands of dollars a month. School buses returning to the ga- rage and charging at the same time boost the demand charge, Davar relayed. That makes energy manage- ment, or smart charging, vital. Technology can spread out the charge over the time the buses are plugged in. “The slower you charge, the cheaper it is because the


utility can predict the energy load,” he added. Mobility House recently helped the Ocean View School District in Ventura County, California, with


infrastructure for electric buses. Bob Brown, director of transportation, realized the facility’s electrical system didn’t have the capacity for electric buses. Southern California Edison approved the district for the Charge Ready Transport program to supply sufficient power to charge the fleet and the transportation facility. “We expect the infrastructure to be completed this summer and will have delivery of two buses later in the year. We also received a grant for a third bus from the Ventura County Air Pollution Control district which fa- vors retiring old diesels in favor of cleaner alternatives,” said Brown. Meanwhile, in northern California, master me-


chanic Larry Betz with the Fall River Joint Unified School District, said a grant from the California Energy Commission (CEC) helped cover the purchase price of a LionC and a Blue Bird Vision Electric school bus. Fall River utilizes AC chargers, and Betz added that he isn’t sure if the district will install DC chargers or not, since another grant allows for the use of renewable diesel.


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