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M


olly Spearman, the South Carolina state superintendent of education, verbalized the fears of educators and student


transporters nationwide during a task force meeting in early May. “It’s impossible to maintain social distancing all day long with children,” she said, according to a report pub- lished at TheState.com. During that same meeting, W. Burke


Royster, the deputy superintendent for Greenville County Schools, brought up another reality soon to be upon all school fleet operators: maintaining social distancing of six feet between student riders. For his district, that means only 13 of the normal 77 students can be loaded onto a conventional school bus, reducing passenger capacity to a mere 17 percent. How exactly is that supposed to work? Then, there is the issue of screening the student health before they get on the school bus. Is this to be a new responsi- bility of school bus drivers? Once again, technology could provide an answer.


Identifying Markers JJ Roberts is the director of PikMyKid in


Tampa, Florida. PikMyKid offers a tech- nology solution for schools and groups that claims to smartly and safely dismiss students from schools and gatherings. But Roberts said he is cautious about artificial intelligence (AI) as a plausible solution for students, given the challenges that the new coronavirus poses. “Certain predictable identifiers, or


symptoms, are associated with COVID-19, and most of these are generally agreed upon by all medical authorities,” he said.


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