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HEALTH & SAFETY


STOP, DROP


Mike Rice reveals the three best practices for mitigating dropped object risk


Barriers are a core solution to prevent dropped objects


onshore and offshore – as market changes drive the sector to push the limits on the lifespan and structural integrity of industrial equipment and vessels. However, a steady rate of dropped object incidents across rigs, vessels and facilities indicates that there is more to be done. Industry statistics demonstrate the scale and nature of the threat posed by


T


echnical innovations are increasingly being adopted to prevent dropped object hazards in the oil & gas industry – both


dropped objects to oil & gas personnel. According to DROPS, dropped objects are among the top 10 causes of fatality in the industry. One global company reported that approximately 68% of its high-potential incidents in 2017 was caused by dropped objects. By now, most HSE and management teams across the industry will be well- acquainted with the threat dropped objects pose; not only to the safety of personnel, but also to the financial, reputational and legal standing of


businesses. In recent years, these risks have motivated many firms to implement increasingly robust mitigation measures as standard. However, with wider market dynamics likely to bring this issue to the fore once more, it is critical that progress is maintained. Corrosion, sustained by vessels and offshore infrastructure during periods of inactivity without maintenance, is likely to elevate dropped object risk, while cost pressures resulting from ‘boom and


www.engineerlive.com 51


DON’T


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