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PRODUCTION • PROCESSING • HANDLING


SECTION TITLE


I


n the oil and gas, as well as chemical and power generation industries, preventing leaks and spillages via component failure is of vital


importance. A reliable and comprehensive positive material identifi cation (PMI) programme is an essential element to ensuring safe plant operation. Handheld X-ray fl uorescence (XRF) analysers are well suited for fast, easy PMI measurements, providing a cost-eff ective way to prevent component failures and maintain plant safety. T e key to running a successful PMI


XRFFOR SAFETY


programme is taking into account the specifi c challenges of the industry. In the oil and gas industry, harsh conditions – and the resulting risks of damage – are one of the most important challenges for inspection equipment. Furthermore, due to the scale of a typical plant, traceability and short measurement times – without compromising on reliability – are also critical for success.


In the oil and gas sector, pipes, solder, welds, connectors and screws all have to be made of the correct alloy for their application. Due to high temperatures and pressures, mechanical stresses and corrosive substances, use of the wrong type of alloy in one component can jeopardise the safety of an entire pipeline or vessel. In a comprehensive PMI programme, all these components


Thierry Couturier explains why handheld X-ray


fl uorescence (XRF) analysers are a fast way to ensure safe operations


www.engineerlive.com 31


INSTANTANEOUS GRADE AND COMPOSITION IDENTIFICATION


The Vanta XRF analyser is designed for harsh industrial conditions


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