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COVER STORY


help users find the price for a specific procedure. They also quote a single bundled price for many procedures, as well as quoting real, direct-pay pric- ing that any and all patients who are not using insurance would pay. Of course, these price transparency


efforts are a starting point, as the listed prices don’t cover any discounts insur- ance carriers and others might offer.


Get Ready for More Reporting Increased surgery volumes, including some that could come with the afore- mentioned expansion of the number of allowable ASC procedures, help drive demand for both mandatory quality reporting and operational reporting, like case costing. Other factors, such as ownership changes, patient satisfac- tion surveys, and value-based care ini- tiatives such as bundled payments all point to the need for greater insight into center operations. Automation and data collection tools can help admin-


istrators cope with the increased bur- den. Whether it is the ability to gener- ate a case costing report that does not take two weeks to assemble or being able to efficiently tie incident reports into peer review, centers should care- fully examine their current automa- tion and technology tools and deter- mine what is needed to build out their reporting capabilities.


It is Not Just Physicians Who Burn Out


Understanding and managing burnout in ASCs among clinicians and admin- istrators remains an ongoing challenge for 2020. While physician and clini- cian burnout has been a hot topic for some time, for those with administra- tive responsibilities, the reality of burn- out is just as acute. By design, the average ASC has a


relatively flat hierarchy. In exchange for greater autonomy, the manage- ment team might be reluctant to add


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a layer of administration and, instead, distribute management responsibilities to existing surgeons and staff. With- out the right resources, however, or appropriate policies and procedures to streamline center operations, everyone can end up feeling they are spread too thin, creating a perfect environment for burnout to emerge. Addressing burnout before it starts


should be a 2020 priority for ASCs. Nurse administrators will need greater training resources, as the depth and complexity of their job increases. The former OR nurse who transitions into an ASC is ready for a challenge but needs all the help she can get as she moves away from an inpatient mental- ity and into more of a “buck stops with me” posture. Now is the time to clarify respon- sibilities and provide administrators with the management tools and orga- nizational clarity they need to remain inspired, engaged and motivated.


Getting to 2021 The ASC market is expected


to


increase to $40 billion this year. Providing patients with a low-cost, high-quality avenue for some of the most common surgeries and proce- dures has created a healthcare seg- ment of breadth and depth that indus- try founders Wallace Reed, MD, and John Ford, MD, could only dream about when they opened the first ASC in 1970. As we approach the half-cen- tury mark, the industry’s next chap- ter will be an equal blend of challenge and opportunity.


Based on more than a decade of


DM6000 Utility/SPD


experience working in an ASC, and in my current role at Simplify ASC, I know we will tackle both forces with our usual energy and grit. We are more than ready to take on whatever 2020 has in store.


DeeDee Dalke is a solutions consultant with Simplify ASC in Brentwood, Tennessee. Write her at DDalke@simplifyasc.com.


18 ASC FOCUS JANUARY 2020 | ASCFOCUS.ORG


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