search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SHAKESPEARE AND THE MUSICAL Sheet music cover for Mr. Hamlet of Broadway, 1908


From movies to songs to ballets to symphonies, William Shakespeare’s work provides rich source material for many art forms. His plays have inspired creators of musical theatre, in particular, for decades, perhaps because the musicality of verse easily translates to storytelling through movement and song. Some of the earliest examples of this exploration come from Eddie Foy, a well-known American clown. His pieces Mr. Bluebeard (1903) and Mr. Hamlet of Broadway (1908) were musical parodies inspired by the characters and stories of Shakespeare. His mixture of song, dance, and clowning paved the way for large-scale musical theatre to venture into adapting Shakespeare.


The first musical inspired by a Shakespeare play to hit Broadway did so in 1938. The Boys from Syracuse used modern language and music to tell the story of Comedy of Errors. One year later, A Midsummer Night’s Dream was given a jazz spin with Swingin’ the Dream. Although this production boasted a star-studded cast, featuring Maxine Sullivan and Louis Armstrong, it only played 13 Broadway performances.


Since these productions, Shakespeare’s plays have inspired musicals such as Kiss Me, Kate (1948), West Side Story (1957), and All Shook Up (2004). Some of these musicals adhere closely to the source material, while others interpret the stories more loosely. Moving beyond the typical musical theatre form, The Donkey Show, for instance, immerses the audience in an interactive disco as the story of A


Midsummer Night’s Dream unfolds around them. Whether modernizing the language and setting or completely reimagining the story, the themes of Shakespeare’s plays remain relevant across time and art form.•


A SUMMARY OF THE SCOTTISH PLAY


Macbeth meets three witches who prophesy that he will become Thane of Cawdor and eventually King of Scotland. Although initially skeptical, once Macbeth is named Thane of Cawdor, he becomes intrigued by the possibility of becoming king. He is encouraged by his wife, Lady Macbeth, to fulfill this prophecy by killing the King of Scotland to take over the throne. Macbeth carries out this deed but grows uneasy with


his new power. Afraid that others will try to seize the throne, Macbeth orders the murders of those who have been prophesied to harm him. Overwrought with guilt, Lady Macbeth begins to sleepwalk and has visions of blood on her hands. As an army marches on his castle, Macbeth learns that his wife has killed herself. In a final battle, a second prophecy of the witches is fulfilled and Macbeth is killed.


16 ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24