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Feature


The role of techn in public estate ef


New technologies and big data are providing facilities managers with p Craig Smailes


increase the efficiency of buildings. Below, Craig Smailes, Project Directo the implications of these capabilities for the UK’s pub


One of the most compelling benefits of the big data revolution is its potential to massively increase energy efficiency – and the public estate sector is ripe for technological transformation. In the UK, buildings are currently responsible for over 40% of energy consumption. Due to both environmental and economic imperatives, improving efficiency is a critical priority. Last year the Prime Minister pledged to halve new building energy use by 2030. Big Data Analysis (BDA), and related


processes, have an increasingly central part to play to play in building construction and performance optimisation. The statistical methodologies used to turn data into insights – and ultimately recommendations – are not new. But the sheer volume and


22 fmuk


range of data now being generated create fundamentally new capabilities. Data has been described as ‘the modern


oil’, for good reason. In sufficient quantities, it is the fuel for BDA – and more advanced methodologies such as machine learning – which can unveil previously opaque insights into human and natural behaviour by analysing patterns and making predictions. Over nine-tenths of all the data we have at our disposal has


been produced in the last two years – its production is only speeding up. How, then, can these tools be used


to increase efficiency in public estate management?


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