search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
DOING BUSINESS


Improve Patient Engagement with Two-Way Texting Advantages of replacing voice mails with electronic messaging BY BRANDON DANIELL


Communicating with patients can be challeng- ing. Traditional meth- ods can be expensive and time consuming and are


becoming less effective every day. A patient might answer the phone, might listen to their voicemail, might read a letter sent in the mail, might go to a patient portal, might follow pre/postop instructions, or might call the facility. That is a lot of mights. The mobile phone has changed the way the world shops, socializes and, most importantly, communicates. One of the biggest changes mobile phones have brought is how American adults engage with phone calls. Gone are the days of phone calls being a convenient, fast and efficient form of communication. A survey by TrueCaller found that 64 percent of adults have not answered a call from a number they did not recognize. If you are nodding your head in agreement, remember that many of your patients are nodding as well. This percentage of unanswered phone calls is only going to increase, call protection company First Orion predicts, as half of all mobile calls in 2019 are expected to be spam robo- calls. If staff do leave a voicemail, bear in mind that, according to The New York Times, more than 30 per- cent of voicemails linger unheard for three days or more, and more than 20 percent of Americans do not check voicemail at all.


Phone calls are no longer the primary form of communication preferred by most American adults. Americans have not only fallen in love with texting, but they have come to rely on it in their day-to-day lives.


95% 54% 34%


THOUSANDS OF EMERGENCY MESSAGES DURING HURRICANE HARVEY AND IRMA... REDUCING STAFF PHONE TIME BY 95%


INCREASED CASH FLOW BY REDUCING ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLES BY 54% IN JUST 6 WEEKS


78% 4K+


REDUCED NO-SHOWS BY 34% DRASTICALLY INCREASING REVENUE


92%


According to The Chicago Tribune, most Americans now prefer to send/ receive a text instead of making/ receiving a phone call.


OVER 78% ENROLLMENT RESPONSE RATE AND REDUCED ACQUISITION COSTS


SENT TEXT MESSAGES TO OVER 4,000 PEOPLE SIMULTANEOUSLY JUST 10 MINUTES


REDUCED POST-OP CALLS BY 92% AND SAVED STAFF MONEY


TESTING RESULTS PROVIDED BY DIALOG HEALTH Texting is a cost-effective, con- Consider


the impact of that statement for an ASC that still relies predominantly on phone calls as its primary patient engagement method. When it comes to texting in Amer- ica, the following research and statis- tics speak volumes: ■■


According to Forbes, 95 percent of text messages are read within 3 min- utes of being sent.


■■ ■■


According to Dynmark, 98 percent of text messages are read.


■■


According to Pew Research, in the 50–64 age range, 88 percent own a cell phone, and in the 65+ age range, 74 percent own a cell phone. Out of all cell phone users, 81 percent use their phone to text message. According


to CTIA, the average response time for a text is 90 seconds. 16 ASC FOCUS FEBRUARY 2019 | ascfocus.org


venient and reliable communication channel that is preferred by patients, so it should be an essential part of an ASC’s communication options.


1. Two-way texting is fast, convenient and expected. The appeal of texting for patients is that it is fast, convenient, easy, conver- sational and on a device that is within arm’s reach almost all the time. Tex- ting also involves no learning curve, requires minimal effort and is already an expected part of a patient’s day. A patient simply needs to provide their mobile number to the ASC. For an ASC, texting is a quick, reliable and cost-effective way to put relevant content at the patient’s fingertips and has a higher response rate than any other traditional forms of communication. Text messages to a patient can include dates, times,


The advice and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and do not represent official Ambulatory Surgery Center Association policy or opinion.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34