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32 FIRES & FIREPLACES


THE BEST OPTION IS KILN-DRIED LOGS, WHICH CAN PROVIDE A MORE CONSISTENT QUALITY


30 and 50 per cent.


The best option is kiln-dried logs, which can provide a more consistent quality, with a moisture content that is generally less than 20 per cent.


There are several reasons not to burn


to G scale of energy performance already applied to white goods such as fridges, freezers and washing machines. Manufacturers must also include a printed label in the stove packaging, with informa- tion in the instructions or on a specification sheet. Brexit will make no difference to the


UK’s response to Ecodesign and Energy Labelling Directives because the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs – which was involved in shaping them – has already confirmed


its intention to bring them into UK law through the Great Repeal Bill.


FUEL MATTERS Efficiency doesn’t depend solely on the quality of the appliance, or how the wood is burned, however. The fuel itself also has a strong bearing on performance. Freshly cut wood has moisture content of 60 to 80 per cent, much too great to burn efficiently. Stove owners tend to buy what is branded as ‘seasoned’ wood, but this still has moisture content of between


wet wood. It releases more particulates/air pollution into the air than burning dry wood, produces less heat (because the energy is being used to burn the water off first), it takes longer to burn, again because the moisture has to evaporate first, and it creates more sooty deposits in a chimney, which could become a fire risk and will mean the stove needs maintaining more frequently.


Buyers need less dry wood to produce the same amount of heat, and less wood means fewer emissions, as well as saving money for homeowners, because they don’t have to buy so much wood.


Ian Sams is commercial director at Specflue.


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