search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SARAH'S SUPPORTING PLAYERS


MANY OF THE SUPPORTING CHARACTERS IN BERNHARDT/HAMLET ARE BASED ON REAL PEOPLE WHO WERE RESPECTED ARTISTS IN THEIR OWN RIGHT. HERE IS A BRIEF “WHO’S WHO” OF BERNHARDT’S BELOVED FRIENDS AND COLLABORATORS.


Photo: HdL85


BENOÎT-CONSTANT COQUELIN (1841-1909) One of the most notable French actors of the 19th century. At just 19, he made his debut at the Comédie-Française and became a company member four years later. He was most lauded for his comedic roles but also succeeded in playing schoolmasters and romantic lovers. While director of the theatre of Porte-Saint-Martin, Coquelin


originated the title role in Cyrano de Bergerac. Then, approaching 60, he toured America with Sarah Bernhardt and, upon their return, co-starred with her in Rostand’s L’Aiglon (1900).


EDMOND ROSTAND (1868-1918)


French playwright of the Romantic period, producing some of the final Romantic strains before the outbreak of World War I. Rostand’s first play, Les Romanesques (1894) introduced him to the world—and would later be adapted into the musical The Fantasticks—and his second, La Princesse Lointaine (1895), featured Bernhardt. His most enduring work


by far is Cyrano de Bergerac, which made its premiere at the theatre of Porte-Saint-Martin in Paris in 1897, starring Coquelin in the title role. Cyrano revolves around the protagonist’s concerns that no woman will ever love him because of his abnormally large nose.


MAURICE BERNHARDT (1864-1928) Bernhardt’s only child, born in 1864 before the actress’s career took off. At the time of Bernhardt’s Hamlet, Maurice would have been 34 years old. Maurice, always fiercely loyal to his mother, married, became a father of two, then was widowed. He later remarried and took to gambling. In 1923, Sarah Bernhardt died in Maurice’s arms.


He would outlive his mother by only five years, but in that time he succeeded in enforcing his right to the lease of the Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt.


ROSEMONDE GÉRARD (1866-1953) Wife of Edmond Rostand and a playwright and poet herself. She is best known for her famous couplet, “For you see, each day I love you more. Today more than yesterday and less than tomorrow.” When her son, Maurice Rostand, was born in 1891, Sarah Bernhardt was the first woman invited to see him. Together, Gérard and her son Maurice collaborated on a play of fairy tales, Un bon petit diable (1912), inspired from the stories Gérard told him as a child. As Bernhardt lay dying, Gérard and Maurice Rostand were among the last admitted to her bedchamber.


ALPHONSE MARIA MUCHA (1860-1939) Czech painter, lithographer, and founder of the Art Nouveau movement. After singing his way through school in Moravia and painting theatrical scenery in Vienna, Mucha was sponsored to attend the Munich Academy of Fine Arts. Mucha then moved to Paris and volunteered at a local print shop to complete a lithograph poster (in just two weeks!) for an upcoming production of Sardou’s Gismonda (1894), starring the legendary Bernhardt. The poster was a runaway success, and Bernhardt contracted Mucha for the next six years. This commercial work, which typically featured beautiful women with halos of hair and flower crowns, introduced the world to the “Mucha style” that would come to be known as Art Nouveau.


Mucha created this poster for Bernhardt’s 1896 American tour.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24