search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
conscious eating


healthy diet is beneficial not only for reduc- ing the risk of chronic diseases, but also for improving mood and overall quality of life.” Hu, Josh Axe, a chiropractor and


doctor of natural medicine, in Nashville, Tennessee, and Dr. Andrew Weil, direc- tor of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona, in Tucson, promote anti-inflammatory foods, backed by recent studies, on their websites. “Small, gradual changes are typically


more sustainable and easier for the body to adapt to,” writes Axe. “So rather than emptying your pantry and sailing off to the Mediterranean, you can pursue an anti-inflammatory diet one step at a time.” Tat’s what Andrea Adams Britt did. A


10 FOODS A


Anti-Inflammatory


Flavorful Ways to Lower Disease Risk by Judith Fertig


ny time our bodies sense an “invader”—a microbe, virus, plant pollen or unwelcome chemical—


they go into high alert, producing white blood cells to fight it off. Once the danger has been thwarted, normal functioning returns. If we continue to expose ourselves to


these threats, then the high-alert process, known as inflammation, becomes chronic. Tis disturbance of natural equilibrium can lead to cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, arthritis, depression and pain. It can also


mask or worsen autoimmune diseases. Eat- ing foods with natural anti-inflammatory properties can help the body function better.


Physician Support “Many experimental studies have shown that components of foods or beverages may have anti-inflammatory effects,” says Dr. Frank Hu, also a Ph.D. and professor of nu- trition and epidemiology in the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “A


professional wedding cake baker from Lee’s Summit, Missouri, Britt experienced bewil- dering symptoms, including digestion issues, depression, migraines, weight gain and skin irritation. In 2015, she eliminated flour and sugar from her diet, and then added more organic leafy green vegetables, coconut oil and wild-caught salmon. Her symptoms went away one at a time, and by last January, she had also lost 100 pounds. Te solution for her was to create flavorful dishes that she enjoyed eating, so she did not feel deprived. Weil advises, “Te best foods are those


that offer disease-preventive benefits such as anti-inflammatory effects and delectable fla- vor. When I eat such foods, I feel as though I’ve hit a grand slam homerun—the sensory pleasure is heightened by the fact that each bite contributes to my overall well-being.” His take on an Anti-Inflammatory


Food Pyramid at Tinyurl.com/Andrew-Weil- Food-Pyramid offers a broad sample of these foods in an easy, downloadable graphic.


8


Austin Edition


AustinAwakenings.com


Kiselev Andrey Valerevich/Shutterstock.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32