search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
27


BUILDING PROJECTS


BLOOMBERG LONDON CITY OF LONDON


Open for business


Bloomberg’s new European headquarters is a big step away from recent landmark City buildings, with a highly bespoke, super-sustainable design whose disciplined exterior conceals a contrastingly open, dynamic interior. James Parker reports


I


n 2010, Michael Bloomberg, three-time New York Mayor and the owner of the financial information giant that bears


his name, began constructing the company’s European headquarters in London. One of the world’s 10 richest people, he admitted at the building’s launch late in 2017 that the decision to base the firm here might have been different if he’d been able to predict the result of the Brexit vote. Despite this, the legacy of a close collaboration with Foster + Partners is a groundbreaking building with a modest yet handsome skin, and some very exciting interiors. Unlike most City office buildings, Bloomberg London is owner-occupied, and as a result the client has put an unusual amount of investment into pushing the design envelope of the interiors, for the benefit of both its employees and the wider community. This privately-owned firm has spared little when it comes to delivering high-quality materials and an open, collaborative place for staff – the build cost reportedly came to £1bn. This building brings over 4000 Bloomberg employees, previously spread over four sites in London, under one roof. That includes 800 software engineers, nearly three times as many as the company had four years ago, with increased investment in artificial intelligence approaches to financial analysis. In addition there are countless media professionals working across the company’s TV, radio and print channels, including in a state of the art TV studio.


A good neighbour


BREEAM rated Outstanding with a score of 98.5 per cent – making it the world’s most sustainable office building – Bloomberg London sits in a compact and triangular 3.2 acre site between Cannon Street and Bank stations – the pulsating heart of the City. It actually comprises two triangular buildings, the larger building to the north separated from the other by a covered pedestrian ‘arcade.’ This reinstates the Roman route of Watling Street, connecting through from Cannon Street to St Paul’s Cathedral – at either end have been added public plazas plus a further one by the main entrance. The north building contains most of the current key functions, with the south building for expansion space, Bloomberg having taken two floors so far.


One of the major design drivers for Mike Bloomberg, who took a very hands-on approach as client, was that this building would not impose itself on its immediate environment. He commented at the launch: “We wanted to respect London’s aesthetic traditions, as a company founded in the US we were conscious we were a guest in London.” He continued: “Norman Foster recognised the opportunity this project presented to do something extraordinarily modern and eminently British”. The result is a civic-scaled building


which, even though it’s only 10 storeys, steps back both at ground floor and the two top two levels, presenting an


ADF APRIL 2018 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84