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LIVE24SEVEN // Travel


Don’t miss climbing to the top of the Albaicin, to reach the Mirador San Nicolas. Here, the Joneses found the most breathtaking view of the Alhambra, sitting against the backdrop of the Sierra Nevada Mountains (snowcapped during winter and spring).


To see another side of the city, Mrs & Mr Jones visited the Capilla Real. This is the most impressive Christian building in Granada. The royal chapel was commissioned by Isabel and Ferdinand to be their final resting place. After the chapel was finished, work began on building the adjoining cathedral, which took 200 years to complete. It has ornate ceilings, soaring columns and some important paintings. Near the cathedral, the Alcaiceria is reminiscent of a small souk with small, individual shops.


To round off their visit of Granada, Mrs Jones was keen to see a flamenco performance. This historic art form is interwoven with the cultural fabric of the city, particularly in the Sacromonte area. While not as initially enthusiastic, Mr Jones quite surprised himself by getting caught up in the passion and drama of the show.


Food & Drink Granada is one of the few cities in Spain still offering a free serving of tapas with a drink. Calle Navas is a lively place to visit for dinner. This narrow, pedestrianised street is lined with tapas bars and restaurants. While it is full of tourists, some of the bars seem to be full of locals too, which is always a good sign.


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For more of a dinner, rather than tapas, Puerta del Carmen on Plaza del Carmen has a lovely, traditional feel to it. It is popular with locals and has a friendly atmosphere. Mr Jones pronounced his Iberico pork dish delicious.


Along the bustling riverside Carrera del Darro, there are plenty of bars and cafes to choose from. To enjoy Granada’s tradition of teahouses, the Patio de los Perfumes, sits behind a shop selling beautifully scented perfume products in a 17th century Renaissance house. Further along, in Paseo de los Tristes, the road opens out onto an esplanade with pavement cafes. Café-Bar Puerta de los Tristes offers a good choice and beautiful views up to the Alhambra.


Where to Stay Mrs & Mr Jones stayed at Palacio de los Patos. This five star Hospes hotel is a beautifully restored 19th century palace. While this hotel is quite a walk from the Albaicin and the Alhambra, it is well placed for shopping and only a 10-minute walk from the cathedral and the bars and restaurants of Calle Navas.


In contrast to the outside of the palace and the traditional lobby, the bedrooms are decorated in a minimalist style, which make use of the traditional features. There is a lovely, large, outdoor patio area with a bar for relaxing with a drink. There is also a great choice on offer for breakfast. The Bodyna Spa provides treatments, a Turkish bath, sauna and small thermal pool.


The Joneses enjoyed the hotel’s ambience and talking to the friendly staff. It is easy to order taxis to get around.


Written by Sara Chardin, travel blogger at allaboardtheskylark.com


TRAVEL INFORMATION: Palacio de los Patos hotel – www.hospes.com Hammam al Andalus - granada.hammamalandalus.com/en Puerta del Carmen restaurant - www.puertadelcarmenrestaurante.com/en-index.html Patio de los Perfumes - en.patiodelosperfumes.com/home.html


Mrs & Mr Jones explored Granada as part of a 6-night self-guided rail journey, The Splendours of Al-Andalus, with Inntravel – www.inntravel.co.uk


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