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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Janet Evans Hinman O


ne of life’s greatest pleasures is watch- ing our young people grow into fine human beings. Academic achieve-


ments are rewarding, sports accolades are a bo- nus, but when our kids evolve into the thought- ful, kind and caring citizens they are meant to be, it is uniquely satisfying. And it doesn’t hap- pen by accident. It takes careful attention from parents, teachers, coaches, friends, neighbors and community leaders, as well as hard work and cooperation from the young people themselves. The end of a school year is a season of awards. Recognition is given to outstanding perfor- mances in a variety of activities. But the wider world rarely gives awards recognizing the simple success of being a good person — honorable, diligent, helpful, loving. And being a fine human being is no small achievement in today’s world. Let’s make sure it doesn’t go unnoticed. In a 2014 commencement address at the University of Texas, Naval Admiral William H. McRaven reminded the school’s 8,000 gradu- ates of the university’s slogan: “What starts here changes the world.” He notes that the average American will meet 10,000 people in a lifetime. “But, if every one of you changed the lives of just ten people, and each one of those folks changed the lives of another ten people, just ten, then in five generations, 125 years, the class of 2014 will have changed the lives of 800 mil- lion people … over twice the population of the United States. Go one more generation and you can change the entire population of the world — eight billion people,” he said. “If you think it’s hard to change the lives of 10 people, change their lives forever, you’re wrong,” he added. Adm. McRaven went on to advise the graduates


that sometimes lives are changed by a good deci- sion, an encouraging word, or a worthy deed. With that in mind, congratulations to all the young people preparing to march out and change the world in ways big and small. We are proud of you. And special thanks to the folks who help them along their path. Well done!


Now that graduation season has passed, we can enjoy the next few months watching our kids pre- pare to take on fresh challenges and adventures, whether it’s a new grade level, college, a new job, or more grown-up responsibilities. It’s sure to be a happy and sentimental time, infused with opti- mism and nostalgia, and we don’t want to miss a minute of it!


In other business, this issue of The House and Home Magazine celebrates some of the delights of high summer. We investigate the fun of croquet on the lawn, then we chill out with some recipes for fruity sorbets and granitas. Of local interest are stories on bridge tenders and the unique red crab. We also feature an article on decorative knots, and highlight a regional institution with nationwide appeal, Edwards Virginia Smoke- house.


Our new and improved website is coming soon; be sure to look for it. As always, you can view our digital magazine at www.thehouseand- homemagazine.com. Enjoy this vacation season with family and friends. Whether you’re at the beach, sitting by the pool, or relaxing in your own backyard, take along your copy of The House and Home Magazine. We hope our stories enter- tain and inform. Make a note to pay a visit to one of our advertisers; they present the finest goods and services our area has to offer and they appre- ciate your business. Read on!


Congratulations Graduates!


6 July/August 2017


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