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Red Crabs are often available from Graham and Rollins Seafood Market.


in relatively shallow water, the Atlantic deep-sea red crab (Chaceon quinquedens) lives in cold deep water. It should not be confused with the Alaskan king crab, although it might be a distant cousin. The red crabs like to stay at about 38 degrees Fahrenheit all the time. The average red crab is about one to two pounds. That is a good-sized crab when you compare it to the popular Chesapeake Bay blue crab. The red crab has an orange-red color in the wild and has spindly legs. They are bigger than the blue crabs living in the Chesapeake Bay. The Atlantic deep-sea red crab does not have swimming paddles like the blue crab that is sometimes referred to as “the beautiful swimmer.” The red crab can reach a maximum weight of 3.75 pounds. Dissimilar to the blue crab that produces offspring in multiple years, the red crab produces offspring only once every two years. The red crab has a lifespan of up to 15 years, while blue crabs unusually do not live longer than three years. It was lobstermen who started


bringing up red crabs caught in their lobster traps in the 1950s and 1960s. In 1964, Andreas Holmsen, professor


The House & Home Magazine 73


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