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MAP 1.


PROPERTY TAXES COLLECTED STATEWIDE, SHARE RETAINED BY COUNTIES AS OF NOVEMBER 2016


10%


30% 20%


40%


Note: Conn., R.I., and parts of Mass. have counties or county-equivalents with no county governments (marked in grey on the map). There was no data available for Maine and Vermont.


Source: Figures reflect different fiscal years, as made available by interviewed state associations of counties and state and county officials in the states with county governments.


counties keep only 23.7 percent of the property taxes collected statewide.


Only 29 states permit counties to implement a local option sales tax. In 19 of these 29 states, voter approval is needed to implement a sales tax, difficult to obtain. For example, five N.C. counties attempted to pass a 2.5 percent sales tax (a rate approved by the state) in their March 2016 elections; all failed to secure a popular vote. In four states (Mo., Texas, Utah and Wis.), any implemented sales tax must decrease property tax levies to prevent an overall tax increase.


Twenty-three (23) states authorize counties to implement a secondary sales tax for specific, statutorily defined purposes. This includes 19 of the 29 states allowing counties to implement a local option sales tax. Another four states (Hawaii, Ind., Md. and Minn.) permit counties to levy a sales tax for specific purposes, despite being precluded from levying a general sales tax. States often require voter approval for introducing these restricted purpose sales taxes or may ask the taxes to be implemented in increments of 0.1 percent, 0.15 percent or 0.25 percent.


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION of COUNTIES | NOVEMBER 2016 COUNTY LINES, SPRING 2017


5 57


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