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OILS & LUBRICANTS


FEATURE SPONSOR


ALWAYS WITH THE BREEZE


Wind turbines are operated across the world, often under unfavourable conditions and extreme temperatures - arctic cold, tropical heat, storms and seawater – these environmental conditions all impact on the efficiency and performance of the turbine, and can challenge the operational functionality of components resulting in increased maintenance efforts and high costs.


Many problems however can be avoided by using a lubricant that is suited to the particular friction point and its operating conditions. Speciality lubricants designed for operation at low temperatures will ensure the wind turbine works across a wide temperature range.


GETTING THE GEARS GOING IN COLD CONDITIONS


As wind turbines are out in the open and subject to the seasons, the gearboxes therein, unlike industrial gearboxes, require high-performance gear oils which include additives suited to the requirements of the material combinations and loads. Modern high-quality gear oils with additive technology comply with FZG test requirements even at low temperatures to ensure that gears are reliably protected against tooth and bearing damage.


Gear oils from Klüber Lubrication consider the gear and the lubricant components, as well as the advice offered by suitable test methods.


SMOOTH OPERATION OF TURBINES WHATEVER THE WEATHER…


At low temperatures during start-up gear oils are often heated to overcome high viscosity and ensure safe lubrication of components. Once heated the gear oils must deliver a continuously high- performance until the required service viscosity is reached, whilst avoiding overheating and the resulting oil damage.


An important requirement in the development of Klübersynth GEM 4-320 N was low residue formation and good filterability. Comprehensive tests performed together with the oil filter manufacturers showed that filtering installations were not damaged, even at low temperatures and with high oil viscosities.


As the temperature changes, so too does oil viscosity in a non-linear way - the oil becomes thinner with increasing temperatures, while it becomes more viscous as temperatures decrease. The viscosity index (VI) describes the oils viscosity - the higher the viscosity index, the smaller the viscosity change of an oil at fluctuating temperatures.


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www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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