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WORKING AT HEIGHT


FEATURE SPONSOR


IT’S ALL IN THE PLANNING...


Ask yourself this question... ‘Do you have the plans, resources and training necessary to preserve life, if an employee was to become injured working at height or in a remote location?’


Are you comfortable with the answer?


Appropriate Planning is the cornerstone of any company, but we are not talking about key targets, financial gain or profit margins, we are talking about people’s lives.


WORKING AT HEIGHT


The nature of working in the wind industry means there is a need to work at height or operate in remote, often challenging environments, both on and offshore. Many of these environments force us to part with our safety blanket of being able to call 999 in our time of deepest need and make us responsible for carrying out our own advanced rescues.


It is standard industry practice to have emergency response and rescue plans in place, but are you truly confident they are suitable and sufficient? Remember, in the event of an incident people will be under sudden and remarkable pressure - are they relevant, accessible, clear and concise. Most of all, will they go right on the day when everything else is going wrong?


REVIEW AND IDENTIFY


It is never too early to review your current plans and identify what can be improved. To take the steps necessary to ensure that the vast array of credible scenarios have been covered. By carefully examining risk factors, contingency plans can be put in place to deal with the emergencies which will arise. You are putting yourself in a better position to be able to respond efficiently and most importantly preserve life. These are perhaps amongst the most poignant legal and ethical questions any organisation can ask itself.


DON’T FORGET THESE SIMPLE QUESTIONS… • Are all the possible risks accurately reflected in your plans?


• Have you tested them? If so, how? Is this realistic?


• Is your rescue equipment current and fit for purpose? How do you know this?


• Is your training relevant to your risks but adaptable enough for the spectrum of scenarios?


• Are you training on purpose built facilities designed with you in mind?


REGULAR HANDS ON FAMILIARISATION


Suitable and sufficient rescue equipment needs to be to hand and people need regular hands on familiarisation along with training in advanced rescue techniques.


Ian Marritt, Service Delivery Manager at HFR Solutions CIC comments, “Planning for incidents at height or in remote locations such as wind turbines is essential when you are considering the welfare of your employees. Training is not enough, practice in the form of exercises is an essential component in preparing to deal with an incident at height or in a remote area.”


HFR Solutions CIC


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www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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