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ARCHITECT FOCUS


S


ince opening in 2012, the £350m cooled conserva- tories at Gardens by the Bay in Singapore have won numerous awards – most


recently the coveted RIBA Lubetkin Prize in September 2013 for best new international building – with judges applauding the design team for pushing the boundaries of environmental and structural design. The two giant biomes are carbon positive – no mean feat con- sidering the amount of energy needed to keep plants cool in a sub-tropical cli- mate like Singapore's – and explore how plants in the Mediterranean and cloud forest environments could be affected by climate change. The project is made up of three


waterfront gardens: Bay South, Bay East and Bay Central; the cooled conservatories are located in Bay South and were designed by architect Wilkinson Eyre, landscape architect Grant Associates, structural engineer Atelier One and environmental design consultant Atelier Ten. The 12,800sq m Flower Dome is home to a collection of plants from Mediterranean regions around the world, and features lavender fields, olive groves and giant baobab trees. The 7,300sq m Cloud Forest Dome tells the story of plants that grow in cool tropical cloud forests. It features a 'mountain' covered in lush vegeta- tion from which a 35m waterfall drops down. Within the 'mountain', exhi- bition spaces explore the impact of


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BAKER PAUL


Creating giant cooled conservatories in Singapore's subtropical climate in an environmentally sensible way required clever thinking, says Wilkinson Eyre's Paul Baker


n The Cloud Forest Dome features an artifical, plant-covered mountain, which visitors can climb


Read Leisure Management online leisuremanagement.co.uk/digital


incremental changes to the earth's temperature and explain the sustaina- ble technologies used in the creation of the cooled conservatories. Gardens by the Bay also fea- tures 18 supertrees, designed by Grant Associates, which are home to thousands of plants and feature photo- voltaic cells to harvest solar energy. The biomes have been designed to cast as little shadow as possible, while highly selective glass filters out heat from the sun. Retractable shades are used to control light levels and limit the heat gain when the sun is out. The energy used to cool the biomes comes from an on-site biomass CHP system fired by horticultural waste. The wider development is also fitted with arrays of photovoltaic panels. Here project architect Paul Baker discusses the project.


ISSUE 3 2014 © cybertrek 2013


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