This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Collegiate Men’s Soccer’s All-Time Win Leader By Chris Gregor


Naming of Jay Martin Soccer Complex Honors


the ohIo Wesleyan unIversIty Board of Trustees has honored health and human kinetics professor and men’s soccer coach John A. “Jay” Martin III ’71, Ph.D., with the naming of the Jay Martin Soccer Complex. Martin is the winningest coach in college men’s soccer history and his teams have won two NCAA Division III national championships—most recently in 2011. That 2011 team and the naming of the soccer facility after Jay were celebrated during Ohio Wesleyan’s 2012 fall homecoming weekend. The university will begin using the new name officially for the 2013 season. The landmark 608th win that made Martin the all time win leader


came against Calvin College in December 2011 and also earned his Battling Bishops their second NCAA Division III national championship. Jay also coached OWU men’s lacrosse for eight years with a 106- 32 record. Before OWU, Martin served as a two-sport assistant at The Ohio State University; was director of sport at the Munich, Germany, YMCA, coaching soccer, volleyball, basketball and lacrosse;


I loved every minute at Springfield College ... The people I met there were role models and still set the tone for how I conduct myself. My parents set my values; Springfield College was the foundation of my professional life.


and was athletics director at the American International School at Dusseldorf. In Germany, he played soccer for the kaiserwerth Club and professional basketball. He was a 2007 inductee into the Springfield College Athletic Hall of Fame. Triangle recently had the opportunity to speak with Coach Martin.


18 What led you to attend Springfield College?


Growing up near Boston, every coach I had was from SC. By ninth grade, I knew I wanted to go there and be like them. It was a big deal; no one in the family had ever gone to college. Unfortunately in high school I was a big jock, didn’t perform academically, and was initially rejected by SC. After going to Dean Junior College for a year, I trans- ferred—it was a hard lesson, but a good lesson, when I learned that I had to continue to work all the time to get what I wanted.


How did your college experience inform your coaching career and style?


I loved every minute at Springfield College. Every day I use something learned there - building relationships with players, or as a faculty member relating to students, or serving as chair of a department or as athletic director. The people I met there were role models and still set the tone for how I conduct myself. My parents set my values; Springfield College was the foundation of my professional life.


What did your European experience teach you about sport and coaching?


The European approach keeps sport in its proper place. As a pretty good basketball player in Germany, I would be held or roughed up by the opposition, but after the game, both teams would go out for dinner and a beer and it was over. It took some getting used to. You learn to fight hard during the game, but when it’s over, it’s over.


continued on page 25 TRIANGLE 1 Vol . 84, No. 1


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com