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urthouse, built in 1852, is the focal point of the town


strict 5) looks through the tax books with Columbia . Walker said she has rebound about 10-15 books have allowed.


State Rep. David Fielding visits with Columbia County Tax Collector Cindy Walker in her office in the Columbia County Annex in Magnolia. Fielding served on the Columbia County Quorum Court for 20 years before he joined the state legislature.


with Columbia Co. Collector


Jamey Griep, (center) who has worked in the Colum- bia County Tax Collector’s office since 1983, explains how computers and digital technology have changed the way the county accepts and records tax payments.


“We’re in our third year of this process and we’re averaging about 20 books a year,” Walker said. “Tese books are very important to our county and I felt it is worth preserving this documentation.” Walker has rebound books from 1855-1925 currently and all the binding is done on site. “Shadowing is a great opportunity for all,” Walker said. “Collectors’ main role is to collect the money and educate the public. Many people do not realize that our public schools


COUNTY LINES, FALL 2012


are funded by property tax and that we also collect for many improvement districts in the county.” She said her office tries diligently to inform the tax pay- ers about the homestead credit, freezing of taxes and how citizens can pay their current taxes in any amount after the books open in March. “My role as a legislator is mainly creating and amending state laws as the need arises,” Fielding said. “Te most grati- fying thing is having the ability to help your constituents.”


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