This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Rare plants and wetlands in Kendall, Stories by Sandy Kaczmarski


“It was the second best feeling of our lives; really the topping on the cake.”


Tat’s how Keith and Norma Tucker, residents of the Village of Newark in Kendall County, said they felt when they learned that four-and-a-half acres of their property along a small Fox River tributary qualified as an Illinois Nature Preserve. Te land is now a conservation easement held by Te Conservation Foundation and further protected by the Illinois Nature Preserves Commission.


Te best feeling, of course, was when they got married.


Tey’ve owned the parcel, along with another six acres, since 1974. After years of exploring, they came to realize this beautiful fen with the small creek running through it was special. Keith says it’s unique because of the hydrological system with springs on the hillside providing cold stream water flowing even in winter. It’s the perfect habitat for rare plants. He describes it as a springy seep that is transformed into an area of uncommon plants with the sun. Always changing, depending on the time of year, the parcel has been described as one of the best natural areas in Northern Illinois.


Marsh marigold


Te Tuckers take care of the property by removing invasive, non-native species such as garlic mustard and buckthorn to make room for the black ash, skunk cabbage, and gooseberries. Tey are particularly proud of the fact the wetland is completely natural, the way it’s been for thousands of years.


Such pristine condition led to the sprouting of a rare little shrub that was found in six counties in the 1800s, but hasn’t been seen anywhere else -- except here -- since the 1990s.


Keith says even though the property is tiny, “it’s a gem.” - 18 -


Conservation: Land Preservation


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52