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Want Your Own Rain Barrel?


Call


630-553-0687, x 302


or visit: www.preservethefox.org


Rain Barrels


Jim Kleinwachter, Land Protection Specialist for Te Conservation Foundation (TCF), says that the promotion of rain barrel use was a natural extension of the Foundation’s Conservation@Home Program (see Page 10).


“We thought it was very important to reach every level -- county, municipal and residents. Rain barrels are a simple thing to get water conservation going.”


Rain barrels, Jim says, give their users free water. “It’s better water that doesn’t have chlorine and it’s naturally soft, without lime and calcium and other minerals.”


TCF offers plastic barrels -- re-used food barrels that once held olives or pickles or maybe cherries shipped to the U.S. from around the world. Retrofitted with screens on top and a garden hose valve on the front, they are easy to transport and use. If you would like to purchase a rain barrel or if you would like to start a rain barrel program in your community, call TCF at 630-553-0687, x 302.


- 12 - Fox River Heroes


“People say I was ahead of my time. I didn’t know any better,” Gary Swick says. “I was just really fortunate as a teacher. I think a lot of teachers teach how they learn.”


Te recently retired science teacher, who has received numerous awards, including Milken Educator, during his more than 30-year career explaining nature and the environment to his students at West Dundee High School, says his college training was in natural resource management.


“I only had eight weeks of teacher training. My training was in a non-conventional setting, at a progressive high school, and in a forest. I had all this field experience, the hands-on, kinesthetic learning, so when I first came to my school job, I focused on trees.”


His students reaped the benefits, moving on from trees to the Fox River. “Te water quality thing has been my biggest focus,” Swick says. “Once a kid gets in a stream, they’ll never see a stream the same way again. Tey find out it’s alive and that it’s threatened, and they really care.”


Gary Swick


Conservation: Precious water


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