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Moynihan gets further ANOC role


Colin Moynihan, current British Olympic Association chair and president of the Association of National Olympic Committees, has been appointed president of the Special Commission for Collaboration Between National Olympic Committees (NOC) and Governments. T e commission includes representatives


from all fi ve continents and Moynihan says the vision is for every NOC to have a “strategically collaborative working relationship with its government, while retaining its autonomy”. UK sports minister Hugh Robertson said


Moynihan’s role “refl ects the infl uence of Britain in international sport”.


Strange heads Glasgow 2014 competition


Vicky Strange, one of the key fi gures behind Scotland’s medal success at the Delhi 2010 Commonwealth Games, has been appointed head of sport competition at Glasgow 2014. As well as playing a pivotal role in Team


Scotland’s second most successful Games performance ever as general team manager, Strange has also been involved in varying capacities at both the Manchester 2002 and Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games. Her primary focus in her new role will


be the establishment of a sport competition functional area, which will become the largest and most visible element of the sport department across all 17 Games sports.


Strange will also lead on sport-specifi c


technical and operational planning, the development of offi cials and the recruitment and management of competition management teams.


Morton directs events at UK sport


Simon Morton has been appointed director of major events and international relations at UK Sport. T is is a new post created following a realignment of the agency’s senior team, aſt er COO Tim Hollingsworth leſt to join the British Paralympic Association as CEO. “We plan to use the opportunities


made by London 2012 and Glasgow 2014 to establish the UK as a leading host of major international events. Our relationships with international sporting federations are extremely important, and we need to support the international community in promoting, governing and developing sport,” Morton says.


ECB appoints four disability forum chairs Jeff Levick has been appointed as chair


T e England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) has appointed Jeff Levick, Martyn Dobson, Paul Millman and Mahesh Patel as voluntary chairmen for the newly created four Regional Disability Cricket Development Forums. T ese forums will provide strategic


direction and relevant expertise to support County Cricket Boards in their delivery of growth, excellence and sustainability in disability cricket. T e appointed chairmen will drive the development of a network of expertise and will work closely with both national disability cricket managers and the regional development managers, to support the delivery of the ECB’s national strategy and objectives in their region.


14 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


for the South and West Forum. He has been involved with cricket – as a player, coach, umpire and administrator – for 50 years. Nottingham County Cricket Club community development offi cer Martyn Dobson will chair the Midlands’ forum. T e London and East Forum will be chaired by Paul Millman who, from 1999 to 2009, held the role of chief executive of Kent County Cricket. Mahesh Patel has worked for 13 years at Sporting Equals and the English Federation of Disability Sport and will be chairing the North Disability Forum. A similar position will be created following


discussions between Cricket Wales and T e Federation of Disability Sport Wales.


Issue 3 2011 © cybertrek 2011


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