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Active Arms,


Fast Legs • First, get


HOW TO


PLAY ONE-HANDED Team USA midfielder Ally Carey speeds up the


transition game BY MEGAN SCHNEIDER


After being selected to both the World Cup and World Games rosters, midfielder Ally Carey did what elite players do: She broke down film. Carey watched Team USA against Florida and Notre Dame at Spring Premiere — full games are on YouTube — and saw attacker Michelle Tumolo gracefully cradling one-handed through defenders to score. Then she saw herself driving down midfield holding her stick out front, also one-handed, to spark a fast-break opportunity. “I run faster when I’m not cradling,” Carey said. “Sometimes you think about the rhythm of cradling and your feet at the same time, and your arms aren’t pumping as fast as they could. I put it in one hand so I can pump my arms faster.”


comfortable with your stick. Practice holding and running with your stick in one hand with wall ball or during fast-break drills.


• In games, determine the right scenario. You need ample space and time, typically in man-up situations.


• Move your hand to the bottom of your stick. Avoid checks to the butt of your stick from trailing defenders.


• Run, syncing the rhythm of your opposite arms and legs. Drive your knee up and push off your back foot.


• Pump your arms. The harder you pump them, the faster your legs will go.


Game Day with Dino


US Lacrosse Magazine went behind the scenes with Team USA coach John Danowski on Jan. 15 as he prepared for a matchup with Notre Dame at IMG Academy. Check it out at uslaxmagazine.com/usa-insider.


USlaxmagazine.com


September/October 2016 US LACROSSE MAGAZINE


57


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