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HOW TO ATTACK THE


Myles Jones BY MATT HAMILTON


After a slow start to his Major League Lacrosse career, No. 1 draft pick Myles Jones fi nished strong with the Chesapeake Bayhawks.


Jones, the only midfi elder in NCAA history with 100 goals and 100 assists, poured in 13 points in the last two games of the 2016 season and found his range with three 2-point goals. He says he’s better than he was at this time last year, but how?


“My shooting has defi nitely changed,” he said. “I’m a lot more accurate since I left [college]. I’m able to shoot the ball in all spots consistently which is always a great skill.”


Jones, who also is in the U.S. player pool, noticed differences in the way opponents defend him. He had to change the way he dodged, especially against long poles.


“In the MLL and playing for Dodging a


Long Pole • Go through the head of the defender’s stick. They have more control over their hands with their only option to V-hold.


• Dodge a little further than a stick length away from the defender to avoid poke checks and any other disruptions.


• Lean into the defender to create separation. Use your right or left shoulder, which is facing downhill toward the cage, to negate any checks that he could throw.


• Keep the separation. When you make your dodge you want to run in a straight line to the spot of your choice.


USlaxmagazine.com HURDLE JUMP


March 2017 US LACROSSE MAGAZINE 55


Team USA, I feel that a lot of more my dodging is downhill with a lot more spring instead of the usual shake and split,” Jones said. “The defense is much better and will get a piece of you if you stop moving your feet.”


POLE Downhill dodging with


©SCOTT MCCALL


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