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GAME SKILLS STICK HANDLING


WHAT IS IT? Essential to long term success and enjoyment, basic stick


skills must be developed at the earliest ages. Girls’ sticks have a shallow pocket so for the ball to stay in the stick, players must master cradling the ball, passing and catching accurately.


FUNDAMENTALS


SOFT HANDS Stick rests comfortably where fingertips meet palm of top hand.


BIG ARMS Elbows and hands are kept extended from the body.


DEVELOPMENTAL


Many youth programs require 3 attempted passes before a team can shoot on goal. This is an important team skill that should be practiced. Accurate, strong passes move the ball quickly and efficiently up the field.


3 SECOND RULE: There is no holding the ball for more than 3 seconds when closely guarded by an opponent who could safely check, if checking was permitted.


As ball skills are mastered, right and left handed stick work should be encouraged at practice.


78 GIRLS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


TRIPLE THREAT Stick head should be slightly above and behind the shoulder so she can pass, catch or shoot.


PROTECTION Keep the body between the stick and defenders.


PLAY SAFE


Players should use a push/pull motion with top and bottom hands to ensure clean and accurate throws.


Players need to get low and run through ground ball pickups.


Players should not reach through other players’ legs to play the ball.


Watch for youth players backing into their defenders to protect their cradles.


WHEN the ball is in play


WHERE on and around the field in games and practice WHO anyone touching the ball


WHY to get or maintain possession, advance ball, learn to pass and catch accurately


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