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GAME PLAY OUT OF BOUNDS


WHAT IS IT? When the ball exits the field by touching/crossing over the


boundary lines, the official blows the whistle to stop play and again to restart play.


WHY designates legal playing area of field.


FUNDAMENTALS


STAND Players must not move after the whistle is blown.


TURNOVER The team that last touched the ball before it went out of bounds will lose possession.


DEVELOPMENTAL


OUT OF BOUNDS calls are important in games. Practice so that players understand what they can and can’t do and begin learning how to use the boundary to their advantage.


CARRYING or throwing the ball out of bounds is always a change of possession and not a foul.


SHOTS When a shot goes out of bounds, player nearest the ball when it crosses the boundary line will gain possession 2 meters inside the line.


RESTART Player with ball moves 2 meters in from the line and all other


players stay in relative positions. PLAY SAFE


A ball carrier may hold her stick outside the boundary line as long as her feet are not on or over the line.


Players directly involved with the play or near the out-of-bounds ball will be placed relative to their positions before the ball went out.


WHEN the ball or ball carrier touches a boundary line or the ground outside of the playing field.


WHERE on or outside the boundary lines around the perimeter of the field.


WHO all players on the field.


46


GIRLS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


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