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INSYNCH


representing my team and together doing the best we could on the ice, putting ourselves out there and showing the stories of our programs to the audience. I realized that I missed speaking, reading and hearing the Swedish language when I was in the U.S. Since I haven’t spoken Swedish for a long time, it was sometimes a bit of a struggle to come up with some words. Everything came back to me when I used it more and more, especially when I saw my old friends at the competition who I haven’t seen for a long time. It was nice that I could see them earlier than planned and catch up with them in a way that reduced my homesickness that I get sometimes when I am in the U.S. I will always treasure and remember this experience to be able to represent the U.S together with my team that has become my second family over the course of the 1½ years since I joined. In the end we performed two clean skates that we are proud of with good skating skills and expressions, leaving our footprints all over the world during our short program, and telling a story about a boy who never grew up, in our free skate. — Svea Wagner, Hockettes junior 2016–17


Members of the Hockettes show their patriotic spirit at Leon Lurje Trophy in Sweden.


the United States. Te loudspeaker announced “Representing the United States of America, here are the Skyliners!” At that moment, all of the prac- tices and hard work came into play. As our team stood on the awards podium, I


felt honored to represent our country in such an intense sport. With my hand over my heart, and listening to the Star-Spangled Banner, I was hon- ored to be standing with my one and only team, experiencing a moment that will last forever. — Olivia Marshall, Skyliners junior 2016–17 Svea Wagner, a member of the Hockettes junior team in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is a Swed- ish citizen. As a member of Team USA, compet- ing at the 2017 Leon Lurje Trophy in Sweden was a unique experience. Wagner said she felt honored to represent Team USA and the Hock- ettes, who placed fifth.


I can still remember the last time I attended


Leon Lurje, where the Hockettes also represented the United States. I remember how in awe I was of the programs and especially of the synchronized death spirals, which was something I had never seen before. How the American teams, from the moment they stepped off the bus, wore the same clothes and showed a certain confidence that was different from the Europeans. Tis experience left an impression that I still can remember. It was such an honor to later have the opportunity to experience it again, but from the other side. At first it did feel a bit odd for me to be at a competition in my home country and represent the U.S., since the three other times I went to the com- petition I represented Sweden, but I got used to it and thought less of it as something that was weird. I focused more on the feeling of being at the rink,


WORLD SYNCHRONIZED SKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS PREVIEW


Te 2017 ISU World Synchronized Skat- The Hockettes perform their short program at Leon Lurje Trophy in Sweden.


ing Championships is one month away. Te first week in April, 26 teams from 21 countries will travel to compete for the title of the 2017 World Synchronized Skating champion. Tis event is returning to Colorado Springs, Colo- rado, for the first time since 2010. U.S. Figure Skating hosted the 2013 ISU World Synchro- nized Skating Championships in Boston, where the Haydenettes (Team USA 1) captured their fourth World bronze medal. Te 2016 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships were held in Budapest, Hungary, where the Haydenettes regained their bronze medal and also became the first U.S. team to win the free skate portion of the event. Miami University (Team USA 2), finished ninth. Te 2017 ISU World Synchronized Skat- ing Championships will have the short program on April 7 and the free skate on April 8 at the Broadmoor World Arena. All-event tickets are on sale until March 1. For more information visit www.2017synchroworlds.com.


SKATING 77


MOMENTS IN TIME PHOTOGRAPHY


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