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JAY ADEFF/U.S. FIGURE SKATING


INTERMEDIA TE


‘SHE’S A WORK


MACHINE’Ciarochi repeats as champion BY TROY SCHWINDT


If Stephanie Ciarochi isn’t skating, she


might be baking an angel food cake, con- structing a skyscraper from a Lego Archi- tecture set or watching her little brother at a hockey tournament. But when she’s on the ice, the eighth-


grader from the Dallas Skating Club is all business. Ciarochi earned her second U.S. title in as many years with a victory on Jan. 15.


Ciarochi, according to her coach Olga


Ganicheva, wakes up every day at 4 a.m. and is on the ice by 6 at the Dr Pepper StarCenter in Plano, Texas. She skates for one hour before heading to school, re- turning to the rink from 3 to 6 p.m. Throw in off-ice training, ballet and, of course, homework, and there’s not much time left for life’s simple pleasures. “She’s a work machine,” said Gan-


icheva, who, with Aleksey Letov, has coached Ciarochi to juvenile and interme- diate titles over the last two seasons. “She’s very determined, knows what she wants. She will not leave or stop until she reaches her goals. She takes in every word.” The short program leader, Ciarochi de-


livered a free skate to Michael Kamen’s mu- sic from the Don Juan DeMarco soundtrack that included three triple jumps (two in combination) a Level 4 combination spin and excellent footwork at the end. Her only negative moment came late


when she fell on a triple toe loop. Ciarochi, though, responded immediately by land- ing a triple Salchow. “I’m most proud of her confidence


and the way she responded after the mis- take,” Ganicheva said. Ciarochi, who has a younger sister


who skates, finished second in the free skate behind pewter medalist Emily Zhang (Richmond FSC) and on top overall with a


56 MARCH 2017


Intermediate ladies (l-r) Emilia Murdock, Stephanie Ciarochi, Ariela Masarsky, Emily Zhang; Intermediate men (l-r) Nicholas Hsieh, Ilia Malinin, Philip Baker, Daniel Argueta; Intermediate pairs (l-r) Jade Esposito/ Franz-Peter Jerosch, Masha Mokhova/Ivan Mokhov, Isabelle Martins/Ryan Bedard, Altice Sollazo/Paul Yeung; Intermediate ice dance (l-r) Layla Karnes/Jeffrey Chen, Katarina Wolfkostin/Howard Zhao, Paulina Brykalova/ Daniel Brykalov, Maria Soldatova/Faddey Soldatov


MEDALISTS


score of 126.54. “This one feels good, but my first title


is more special,” Ciarochi said. Next for Ciarochi, Ganicheva said, will


be to move up to the novice and junior levels and improve upon her jumps and overall skating. Securing the silver medal, Emilia Mur- dock (SC of Boston) matched Ciarochi with the best component marks of the free skate. Her program to music from the British drama film My Week with Marilyn in- cluded two triple Salchows (one in combi- nation), Level 4 spins and fine footwork. Murdock, an eighth-grader, is coached


by Mark Mitchell and Peter Johansson at the Mitchell Johansson Method in Boston. She finished sixth at sectionals last year and was the U.S. juvenile silver medalist in 2015.


“She’s comes in, worked really hard,


got a couple of jumps clean and has worked a lot on everything,” Mitchell said. “She pulled it all together and competed like she has all year.”


LADIES Gold | Stephanie Ciarochi Silver | Emilia Murdock Bronze | Ariela Masarsky Pewter | Emily Zhang MEN Gold | Ilia Malinin Silver | Nicholas Hsieh Bronze | Philip Baker Pewter | Daniel Argueta PAIRS Gold | Masha Mokhova/ Ivan Mokhov Silver | Jade Esposito/ Franz-Peter Jerosch Bronze | Isabelle Martins/ Ryan Bedard Pewter | Altice Sollazo/ Paul Yeung ICE DANCE Gold | Katarina Wolfkostin/ Howard Zhao Silver | Layla Karnes/ Jeffrey Chen Bronze | Paulina Brykalova/ Daniel Brykalov Pewter | Maria Soldatova/ Faddey Soldatov


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