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What does caring for the land mean to you? Tom: To me, stewardship is about if the practice can be replicated. It has


to be good for the environment, soil and people. If one leg on that stool is not in place, it tips over and that practice is not sustainable.


If you could explain one aspect of agriculture to someone who isn’t


familiar with agriculture, what would it be? Tom: People I know engaged in agriculture absolutely love what they do. It’s a labor of love, a passion and a lifestyle more than some loſty career goal. When we get up every day, we like what we do. We are passionate about doing a great job. We’re creating food for our family and yours. Tat’s something we take very seriously.


If you could describe in one word the life of a rancher, what would it be? Tom: Passion.


Lastly and most importantly, what is your favorite cut of beef and how


do you like to prepare it? Tom: I love the rib eye cap steak grilled to medium doneness. Tat strip of meat on the top side just melts in your mouth!


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FAST FACTS ABOUT THE BEEF COMMUNITY


Te Oklahoma beef community has 51,000 farming and ranching families and of that there are 42,000 farms and ranches with less than 100 head. 97 percent of beef farms or ranches are family-owned. Fiſty-four percent of these farms and ranches have been in the same family for three generations or more.


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It’s important to note, beef ’s environmental footprint is shrinking. Each pound of beef raised in 2007 (compared to 1977) used 19 percent less feed, 33 percent less land, 12 percent less water and 9 percent less fossil fuel energy.


According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), beef production accounts for only 1.5% of all greenhouse gas emissions in the US.


All beef cattle are raised on grass, although mature cattle are oſten moved to feedyards for four to six months during which time they constant access to water, a carefully balanced diet made up of roughage (such as hay, grass and fiber) and grain (such as corn, wheat and soybean meal) and room to move around. Veterinarians, cattle nutritionists and cattlemen work together to look aſter each animal.


Te beef lifecycle is perhaps one of the most unique and complex lifecycles of any food. It takes anywhere from 2-3 years to bring beef from the farm to your dinner table. Producing the best beef in the world is an artisan process not a factory one.


Learn more about the farmers and ranchers behind your beef and other beef questions at www.oklabeef.org


Don’t forget to visit ZZZ EHHƮWVZKDWVIRUGLQQHU FRP for great beef recipes and cooking tips.


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