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The Power of and Need for Research in Metalcasting


While the industry can do better in some areas, there are opportunities for growth and improvement. DOUG TRINOWSKI, HA INTERNATIONAL (WESTMONT, ILLINOIS)


Tis article is adapted from the Hoyt Memorial Paper and Lecture delivered by Doug Trinowski at the 2017 Metalcasting Congress in Milwaukee.


A


n excellent, well- annotated article about technology transfer was authored by Hee Jun


Choi. In it he states, “Most people tend to consider only the technical aspects, such as knowledge, skills, techniques, machines, and resources, in the technology transfer process. Technological advances tend to increase in complexity and uncer-


tainty, making end users dependent on specialized experts. “Most organizations delay in-house


adoption of complex technology until they obtain sufficient technical know- how to both implement and operate it successfully. Te burden of developing technical know-how through organi- zational learning becomes a hurdle to adopting new technology.” Te literature has many refer-


ences to the difficulty in transferring technology and implementing its use. Several refer to the “perceived useful- ness” and the “perceived ease-of-use” as having significant influence on the implementation of a new technology. Tere has long been the discussion


Doug Trinowski delivers the Hoyt Memorial Lecture during the 2017 Metalcasting Congress in Milwaukee.


28 | MODERN CASTING June 2017


of “market pull” vs. “technology push,” and which is more effective in the adoption of innovation. In private dis- cussions, several of my sources cite that foundries don’t want to be “innovators” or “early adopters” of an emerging technology as it involves accepting more risk to their existing processes. Tey would much rather be part of the “early majority,” as at that point more of the risk has been mitigated by refinement of the technology. Could this possibly be part of the explanation for why we see slow adoption of certain emerging tech- nologies in U.S. foundries? Advanced inorganic binders have been adopted since 2005 by three automotive OEMs in Germany and now Tier 1 suppliers in many parts of the world to produce both aluminum cylinder heads and motor blocks. Yet, to date, there are no commercial uses of advanced inorganic


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