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rapidfire


Never Stop Serving R


etired Col. Frank G. Wickersham III spent 27 years in the Marine Corps and has continued his dedication to the military


community through his work with the Northern Virginia MOAA Business and Networking Group (NOVA MOAA BANG), which helps servicemem- bers find employment. Why did you found NOVA MOAA BANG? Succinctly put, no one should have to undergo the personal trauma of the job search without having a professional support network. ... The BANG was created to provide just that support: a group of associates that support, assist, and encourage. Although the BANG is mainly composed of military, it is open to all and free to all. Over the past 20 years, the BANG has helped thousands of folks find new employment and create lasting profes- sional networks. The importance of BANG is that it allows its members to help others and to continue to serve. How can people take advantage of BANG’s services? The BANG is al- ways free of charge and open to all. In the greater Washington, D.C., area, we meet monthly to hear from a wide array of spotlight speakers who are experts in all facets of the civilian workplace and the job-


search process. For those not living in the greater Washington, D.C., area, the BANG sponsors an email network that reaches over 70,000 people. As a member of the BANG, you will receive monthly announcements on job openings, job fairs, job-search articles, and meeting updates. In brief, our BANG is based on voluntary mem- bership and an email broadcast “push system.” We have helped place people in positions across the U.S. and around the world. Why is MOAA membership impor- tant to you? To come full circle from where I began these answers, MOAA is my post-service “mother regiment.” By participating at the chapter and council levels of MOAA, I have been able to continue to serve fellow ser- vicemembers, the community, and — by extension — the nation. MOAA membership allows all warrant and commissioned officers of the seven uniformed services to continue to serve well after they have departed active duty. This service is rewarding, fulfilling, and necessary. In battle, military members protect and sacri- fice for others. So too should it be in civilian life. MOAA allows me to con- tinue to serve others. — Kenya McCullum


Attention! Check out these military-related entertainment offerings.


BOOK PAWS OF COURAGE: TRUE TALES OF HEROIC DOGS THAT PROTECT AND SERVE (National Geographic, 2016) Ca- nines serve alongside hu- mans in the line of duty, helping police enforce the law and protecting


servicemembers deployed overseas. Paws of Cour- age showcases 22 dogs and their stories of devo- tion, courage, and loyalty.


FILM ALMOST SUN- RISE (Thoughtful Robot, 2016) This feature docu- mentary tells the story of


22 MILITARY OFFICER OCTOBER 2016


two young Iraq War vet- erans who journey 2,700 miles across the U.S. from Wisconsin to Cali- fornia and discusses the moral implications and aftereffects of war.


TV HELL BELOW (Pa- cific Fleet, 2016) Hell


Below uses stock footage, expert analysis, engaging narrative, and dramatic reenactments to bring to life the greatest Al- lied submarine patrols of World War II. The series features six one-hour episodes that air on the Smithsonian Channel. MO


PHOTO: STEVE BARRETT


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