search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Currents


R EFL ECTIONS


WISDOM BEGINS IN WONDER. PHOTO: WOODS WHEATCROFT


WHY A GENERATION NEEDS TO GET BACK IN TOUCH WITH THE ORIGINAL PLAY STATION


BORN TO BE WILD


A trick-or-treater showed up at my friends Paul and Kate’s house last Hallow- een. He didn’t arrive in costume. In fact, like all babies, he arrived buck-naked. Canyon Ross Kuthe, son of a paddling instructor and a river conservationist, was born with several in-utero paddling trips already under his belt. We’d been making the usual jokes: he’ll be rolling at one, surfing before the terrible twos, and running waterfalls by four. Every once in a while someone jokes that he’ll rebel and get really into video games. Paul glares at them. But Paul and Kate have it right. I had similar experiences. Schulman family


gatherings inevitably feature stories about camping trips I was too young to remember but clearly influenced my life path. Today’s kids spend less time in nature compared to past generations. With an estimated seven hours per day spent on electronics, it’s not surprising— what kid has time to go outside? Canyon’s adventure-friendly childhood is quickly becoming a relic of the past—and it’s a problem. Modern medical research has piled up evidence that time spent in nature is essential to happy brains and bodies. We’ve proven that nature sparks creativi- ty—which Byron and Wordsworth already knew from their inspiration-seeking rambles through the Lake District. We’ve shown that people recover faster from illness surrounded by nature—which Edward Trudeau knew way back in 1885, when he started tuberculosis rehabilitation in the Adirondacks. And exercis- ing outdoors leaves you happier than working out indoors—which maybe your mom already knew when she told you to go outside and play. Our connection with the natural world is likely hard-wired. Humans evolved in small bands, slow, clawless and flightless amongst saber-toothed cats. Our brains, social cohesion and opposable thumbs were what got us by. Familiarity with the environment had an evolutionary advantage. Everyone on Earth shares that wilderness-dwelling human heritage, even though most of us live very dif- ferently now. Today 80 percent of North Americans live in cities, and that number con- tinues to grow. We raise kids as independent parents instead of in communal groups. We get more done on screens than with our opposable thumbs. This has enormous benefits for individuality, social and geographic mobility, career fulfillment, and the leisure to paddle for fun rather than a desperate need for seal meat. Yet, as we distance ourselves from the natural world we suffer—and so does the next generation. Grab a boat—any boat—and some kids, and get out on the water. Now, and


often. Don’t worry about whether the kids ever learn an efficient forward stroke. First and foremost, kids need the opportunity to discover that being outside is awesome. A few years ago, three friends and I were camped on an island deep in the Brit- ish Columbia fjords. Two weeks of wilderness solitude was broken by an engine, which disgorged 12 kids on “our” beach and motored off. It was like Lord of the Flies. The unsupervised kids made tons of noise, built fires, swam from island to island in frigid water, chased each other through our camp, and kept us awake. At the time it pissed us off. But now I realize it may well have been the best possible thing in the world.


Neil Schulman celebrates kayaking’s diverse heritage in Reflections. This article first appeared in the 2016 Paddling Buyer’s Guide.


26 PADDLING MAGAZINE


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86