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It certainly wouldn’t be worthy of being featured in this magazine.


RPMN: What do you enjoy doing on your days off?


I now live a great life. My husband and I travel as much as we can. We’ve been to every continent except Antarctica. In the beginning of this year we spent some time in Africa where we climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro and went on a self-drive safari with our best friend, Jacopo. I have many hobbies and flying is still one of them. I go up with friends and family every chance I get.


RPMN: What is your greatest career accomplishment to date?


I’d say working for Miami-Dade Air Rescue has been my greatest accomplishment yet. I became a firefighter/EMT specifically for that position. I consider myself very young. (This is the part where my co-workers laugh at me and tell me their socks are older than I am.) I’m far from finished with my career. I am also in pursuit of my bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering at Embry-Riddle. Sky’s the limit, right?


path. Accidents are often due to a series of bad choices in a culturally corrupt environment. The objective is to enjoy a long career; stamina and longevity should be the goal. Safety and conservation, within reason, are practical methods of accomplishing this.


RPMN: In your view, what is the greatest challenge for the helicopter industry at this moment in time?


Aviation has been teetering on the balance between automation and human intervention for a while now. Technological growth is exponential; the most obvious example of this is drones. Educating non-aviators about safety practices in general is always a


challenge; now that challenge seems to be aggravated by drone flyers and administrators attempting to take traffic control to the next level by utilizing automation and privatizing ATC.


Do you know someone who would be a good subject for Meet a Rotorcraft Pro? Email your suggestion to the editor-in-chief:


lyn.burks@rotorcraftpro.com


WATCH VIDEO NOW!


RPMN: Have you ever had an “Oh, crap” moment in a helicopter? Can you summarize what happened?


One time, I was flying to Brazil in an R44. We were a flight of two and just fueled up at SMJP in Suriname when about three miles from the airfield my engine quit. Being that I was only at about 400 feet, I’m extremely grateful there was a narrow cutout for what looked like a truck in a backyard, which butted up against a river. Two good things came out of that: first, I’m happy to say that autos really do work. Second, I made the local newspaper. It was in Dutch so I couldn’t read it, but I was still stoked.


RPMN: If you could give only one piece of advice to a new helicopter pilot, what would it be?


The mental fundamentals you learn for flying are needed in all aspects of aviation and at every level from leadership down. It’s all too easy to make poor decisions because you’re trying to please your boss, your crew, etc. Staying true to one’s principles as an aviator will keep one on a safe and effective


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