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Technology | anti-counterfeiting With counterfeits making up some 10% of globally traded goods


today it has never been more important to step up product security measures. Peter Mapleston reviews the latest initiatives


Additives take on counterfeits


Practically all original products are counterfeited. From the smallest electronic component to the largest turbine blade, it seems just about anything is game for fraudsters. Experts estimate that counterfeits make up at least 10% of all globally traded goods today. Despite the efforts of enforcement agencies, it is unlikely that counterfeiters are going to go away any time soon so it makes sound sense for players across the plastics supply chain to make full use of additive technologies that at least facilitate the distinction between genuine product and copy. For obvious reasons, companies operating in this


area don’t give very much detail away about the additives they employ, who is using them, and how. But this article presents a flavour of the technologies in use and under development. In October, for instance, speciality chemicals


company Clariant announced that it had joined forces with SICPA – a Swiss provider of security solutions - to


www.compoundingworld.com


launch Plastiward, which is described as a robust integrated protection system for plastic pharmaceutical packaging or medical devices. The two companies already cooperate on the use of special pigments for inks, but this is the first time they have worked together on anti-counterfeit plastics. Clariant says the technol- ogy, initially targeted at the pharmaceutical industry, is likely to be expanded to other sectors once established. Clariant says that the market for portable plastic


pharmaceutical packaging such as insulin pens and inhalators is big and growing rapidly. One report projects a CAGR of 6.5% for the global medical devices market from 2014 to 2020, rising from an estimated $61bn in 2014 to $89bn in 2020. “This strong growth has also attracted counterfeiters


and others dealing in illicit trade,” the company says. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that 8% of medical devices in circulation are counterfeits. In one case, in 2009, over two million fake insulin pen


December 2016 | COMPOUNDING WORLD 41


Main image: There are no limits when it comes to


counterfeit products. However, plastics additive


technologies may provide some much needed


protection and security


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