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additives | Flame retardants


Fire performance of various polyolefin compounds containing MCA PPM Triazines and BASF Flamestab NOR 116


PP (%) PE (%)


MCA® PPM Triazine HF (%) MCA® PPM Triazine 765 (%) Flamestab NOR® 116* (%) 0.2 mm


Total Burning time (s) UL 94 (3.2 mm)


UL 94 (1.6 mm)+ Nanoclays/PTFE Source: MCA


0


98 1


1 B-2 (fire test) > 260 40 V-2 V-0 (?)


refractory products company RHI) and Germany. Huber offers ground and precipitated grades of ATH


in all areas, the latter being purer and better suited for applications such as wire and cable. “We sell a lot of MDH in applications using higher processing tempera- tures, since ATH decomposes at 220°C,” he notes. “Even at lower temperatures, some customers still use MDH, in combination with ATH, to get a combination of performance characteristics offered by each type.” There is no doubt that brominated flame retardants


are more efficient than ATH and MDH, Halpert acknowl- edges, meaning addition levels with the latter need to be much higher to obtain similar flame resistance. But when regulations or customer preferences call for halogen-free systems, Huber can develop suitable formulations. These often involve synergists. The company is, for example, currently involved in the development of flame retardant insulation for alumini- um building panels to prevent a recurrence of a recent incident in Dubai that saw a high-rise building engulfed in flames (new buildings in the UAE must now have fire-resistant exterior cladding). A Martinal highly loaded ATH core compound


enables aluminium sandwich panels to meet Euroclass A2 requirements. The compound meets CPR A2s1d0, indicating low smoke formation and no generation of burning droplets. Many people today incorrectly believe that only high


grade precipitated magnesium hydroxide should be used for flame retardant applications, says Jim Innes at Flame Retardants Associates, which is introducing Hydrofy products into the US from Italian company Nuova Sima (the world’s largest producer of natural flame retardant MDH). “In the European market, this perception has become


obsolete. Today, natural (non-precipitated) magnesium hydroxide has found its way into multiple flame retard- ant applications such as wire and cable, roof membrane,


30 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016


Stable improvements BASF highlights its nitrogen-based flame retardants, including Melapur MC, Melapur 200 and Flamestab NOR 116. Melapur MC melamine cyanurate is typically used in applications for polyamides, PBTs and TPUs while Melapur 200, a melamine polyphosphate, protects in applications using glass fibre reinforced products based on PA6, PA66, PBT and epoxy resin. Flamestab NOR 116, which uses NOR HALS


technology, achieves its best performance when used in thin polyolefin applications such as films, tapes, woven and nonwoven products, the company says. However, Kaul at MCA says this can be extended into thicker films and higher melting point polyolefins by combining Flamestab NOR 116 with MCA’s PPMTs. Flamestab NOR 116 also enhances thermal and light


stability in the final product as the NOR HALS technology was developed primarily as a light stabiliser system. “Further developmental work has proven that depending on the molecular structure the property profile can be tailor made to fulfil different tasks: rheology modifiers as well as flame retardant,” BASF says.


Click on the links for more information: ❙ www.albemarle.comwww.chemtura.comwww.icl-ip.comwww.lanxess.comwww.frxpolymers.comwww.tolsa.comwww.byk.comwww.polymerdynamix.comwww.clariant.comwww.mcatechnologies.comwww.paxymer.sewww.italmatch.comwww.adeka.co.jp/enwww.dowcorning.comwww.hubermaterials.comwww.nuovasima.itwww.basf.com


www.compoundingworld.com


85 0 0


15 0


85 0


15 0


composite panelling, and electrical/electronic compo- nents,” says Innes. “As a result, natural magnesium hydroxide is widely accepted across Europe as a low cost effective substitute for the higher priced precipitated grades in many flame retardant plastic formulations.” Innes says that the annual consumption of natural


flame retardant MDH in Europe, estimated at more than 30,000 tonnes, has surpassed that of precipitated grades. “Natural grades are increasingly being accepted in other global markets as well, including Asia and NAFTA,” he says.


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