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FROM THE HILL


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agent that must be applied on a timely basis but which faces a shortage of hauling equipment because trailers are being used to haul propane. Samson said it’s not as simple as just


paying for a bond.Under the law, carriers must have someone on staff with three years of brokerage experience or experience that has been deemed allowable, with “allowable” still being defined by the FMCSA’s rulemaking process. For some of his clients with 10 trucks and three or four employees, those are prohibitive requirements. The cost of the bond itself can be a problem. “I’ve heard as low as $1,700, but I’ve also heard as high as you having to come up with collateral for the whole thing,” he said. Samson has drafted corrective language,


signed by 32 state trucking associations (including Maryland Motor Truck Association), that he hopes will make its way into the next surface transportation bill. The provision also substantially affects


intermodal carriers with port operations. CurtisWhalen, executive director of the American Trucking Associations’ Intermodal Motor Carriers Conference, said that type of business is extremely unpredictable. Enormous cargo ships arrive in port at unexpected times with unexpected cargo loads. Thousands of containers are unloaded, creating huge congestion problems. Penalties apply if containers are not moved within a certain time period. Whalen said his conference fully supports


increasing the broker bond provision. Maritime trade attracts many foreign companies who don’t need more than a phone to go into business. Then they just disappear. Louis Campion, President and CEO of the


Maryland Motor Truck Association, said the provision affects his members operating at the Port of Baltimore greatly. The MAP-21 provision shouldn’t have been used to change an informal practice that has been used for decades. “The intent of Fighting Fraud in


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Transportation was to crack down and limit unscrupulous brokers.Wrapping motor carriers up in this really has damaged the operational flexibility of many trucking companies,” he said. Nancy O’Liddy, director of government


affairs for the Transportation Intermediaries Association, says the provision was part of a compromise agreed upon by the American Trucking Associations, OOIDA, and the TIA. The individual conferences now complaining


16 ROADWISE | ISSUE 5, 2014 | www.mttrucking.org


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A Working ‘Retirement’ Jim Dixon of Dixon Brothers


HOS OILFIELD EXEMPTION • SAFETY SPOTLIGHT


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