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10 WEEKLYPRESS.COMUCREVIEW.COM • DECEMBER 29, 2014 ALMANAC december 29 If you miss the Monday noon editorial deadline for Almanac listings, please enter


your event yourself, day or night, on our online calendars at www.ucreview.com and www.weeklypress.com! In order to have events published in our calendar, you must provide a phone, as well as website address if available for more information!


To submit new calendar listings, email newsdesk@pressreview.net, fax: 215-222-2378. MONDAY, DECEMBER 29TH


MONDAY, JANUARY 5TH


Celebrate Kwanzaa at the Central Library, from 12-3 p.m. Lunch & a Kwanza gift will be provided to each child. 215-686-5322.


Health Insurance Enroll- ment assistance at the Wal- nut West Library, 201 S. 40th St..,12-4 p.m. Make appoint- ment for help with trained professional. 215-685-7671.


English as a Second Lan- guage at the Independence Library, 18 S. 7th 215-685-1633.


St., 3 p.m.


Spanish for kids at the Wal- nut West Library, 201 S. 40th St., 4-5 p.m. 215-685-7671.


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30TH


Baby Rhyming Time at the Philadelphia Institute, 1905 Locust St., 11 a.m. 215-685- 5730.


Celebrate Kwanzaa at the Central Library, from 12-3 p.m. Lunch & a Kwanza gift will be provided to each child. 215-686-5322.


Totally Pre-K Hurray at the Independence Library, 18 S. 7th


St., 10:30 a.m. 215-685- 1633.


Kids Quilting at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th 3:30 p.m. 215-685-7671.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 31ST Chess Club for all levels at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th


St., 5:30 p.m. 215-685-7671.


J.S. Bach Christmas Orato- rio BWV 248 in six parts at the Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral, 3701 Chestnut St, 4-8 p.m.


$15-$45. 267-240-ALTO, www.choralarts.com.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 1ST Happy


New Year! SATURDAY, JANUARY 3RD


Health Insurance enroll- ment assistance at the Wal- nut West Library, 201 S. 40th St., 12-4 p.m. Pre-registrar: 267-207-3645.


Lap Top Lab at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th 10 a.m. 215-685-7671.


St., St.,


Health Insurance Enrollment Assistance at the Durham Li- brary, 3320 Haverford Ave, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Trained profession- als will help you enroll. Pre- register: 267-207-3645.


Laptop Lab at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th 215-685-7671.


St., 5 p.m.


SmART Readers Art & Literacy program at the Cobbs Creek Li- brary, 5800 Cobbs Creek Pkwy, 4:30 p.m. For 2nd


-5th grade stu-


dents. 215-685-1973. TUESDAY, JANUARY 6TH


Affordable Care Enrollment Session at the Blackwell Li- brary, 125 S. 52nd


St., 2-4 p.m.


Trained professionals will help you enroll. Pre-register: 215- 977-7255.


A Taste of African Heritage at the Central Library, 1901 Vine St., 6 p.m. 215-686-5322.


Kids Quilting at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th 3:30 p.m. 215-685-7671.


St.,


Music & Movement Storytime at Philadelphia Institute, 1905 Locust St., 10 a.m. 215-685- 6621.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7TH


Chess Club for all levels at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th


St., 5:30 p.m. 215-685- 7671.


Health Insurance Enrollment help at the Blackwell Library, 125 S. 52nd


St., 2 p.m. Pre- registrar: 215-977-7255.


Mariposa Food Co-op Work- shop Series: Fundraising 101, 4824 Baltimore Ave, 7-8:30 p.m. www.mariposa.coop.


Taking Sides screened at the Philadelphia Institute, 1905 Lo- cust St., 2 p.m. 215-685-6621.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 8TH


Health Insurance Enrollment Assistance at the Paschalville Library, 6942 Woodland Ave, 2 p.m. 215-685-2662.


Homework Help at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th 3:30 p.m. 215-685-7671.


St.,


Moorish Unification Council of the World Inc. presents its annual day celebration at the Kingsessing Recreation Center, 49th


& Kingsessing Ave, 5-9 p.m. 215-476-0280.


The Psychology of Achieve- ment: Grit, Self Control and the Hidden Power of Char- acter at the Trinity Center for Urban Life, 22nd


St., 7-9 p.m. www.center- cityresidents.org.


FRIDAY, JANUARY 9TH


Library open hours at Mari- posa, 4824 Baltimore Ave, 5-7 p.m. www.mariposa. coop.


SATURDAY, JANUARY 10TH


Lap Top Lab at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th 10 a.m. 215-685-7671.


p.m. 215-685-2690. MONDAY, JANUARY 12TH


Health Insurance Enroll- ment Assistance at the Dur- ham Library, 3320 Haverford Ave, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Trained professionals will help you enroll. Pre-register: 267- 207-3645.


Laptop Lab at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th 5 p.m. 215-685-7671.


St.,


Mysterious Travelers Concert Series featuring Dan Hanrahan at the Cen- tral Library, 1901 Vine St., 7 p.m. 215-686-5322.


SmART Readers Art & Lit- eracy program at the Cobbs Creek Library, 5800 Cobbs Creek Pkwy, 4:30 p.m. For 2nd


-5th grade students. 215-


685-1973. TUESDAY, JANUARY 13TH


Affordable Care Enrollment Session at the Blackwell Library, 125 S. 52nd


St., 2-4


p.m. Trained professionals will help you enroll. Pre- register: 215-977-7255.


Kids Quilting at the Walnut West Library, 201 S. 40th 3:30 p.m. 215-685-7671.


Music & Movement Sto- rytime at Philadelphia In- stitute, 1905 Locust St., 10 a.m. 215-685-6621.


Seth Grahame-Smith reads/ discusses The Last Ameri- can Vampire at the Central Library, 1901 VineSt., 7:30 p.m. 215-686-5322.


Small Business Tax work- shop at Central Library, 1901 Vine St., 6:30 p.m. Free. Pre- register: 215-686-5394.


St., St.,


LEGO Club at the Kingsess- ing Library, 1201 S. 51st


St., 2 P


olitical updates on the State & Local Level


The UC Review and Weekly


Press compile political news that affects voters each week on the city and state level to keep readers more abreast of local politics. If there’s an is- sue you would like included in this column, please email it to newsdesk@pressreview. net by the Monday, noontime deadline!


Congressman Chaka Fattah (D-PA), architect of GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Pro- grams), hailed the college readiness program’s contin- uation of funding in the re- cently signed spending bill as a success for the initia- tive that aims to send more students from low-income backgrounds to college. GEAR UP will be funded at $301 million in FY15, part of the Department of Educa- tion’s overall budget.


PEACE CORPS continued from page 7


Connecticut, Maine, Mas- sachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. Peace Corps recruiters are based locally throughout the region. Find the regional recruitment of- fice near you by visiting the Peace Corps website. About the Peace Corps: The Peace Corps sends the best and brightest Ameri- cans abroad on behalf of the United States to tackle the most pressing needs of people around the world. Volunteers work at the grassroots level to


Since its establishment, GEAR UP has received $4.8 billion in federal funds and served more than 13 mil- lion students nationwide with its unique, research- based model. The program serves cohorts of students as early as 6th grade, creating a college-going culture in collaboration with schools, colleges, universities, and nonprofits within each com- munity.


“The continued bipartisan support for GEAR UP is a testament to the increasing success of the program,” Congressman Fattah said. “We know GEAR UP works in preparing low-income students for a bright future that not only includes grad- uating from high school, but pursuing opportunities in higher education. This fund- ing will provide hundreds of thousands more stu- dents—including many here at home in Philadelphia— the preparation, resources, and support necessary to


develop sustainable solu- tions that address chal- lenges in education, health, economic development, agriculture, environment and youth development. Through their service, volunteers gain a unique cultural understanding and a life-long commitment to service that positions them to succeed in today’s global economy. Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps in 1961, nearly 220,000 Americans of all ages have served in 140 countries worldwide. For more information, visit www.peacecorps.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter. *Peace Corps data


& Spruce continued from page 3 UNCF


nization, and its member HBCUs have enabled more than 430,000 students to earn college degrees. UN- CF’s 37 member institutions currently enroll more than 50,000 students, most of whom are first-generation, low-income students of color.


About UNCF UNCF (United Negro Col- lege Fund) is the nation’s larg- est and most effective minority


education organization. To serve youth, the community and the nation, UNCF sup- ports students’ education and development through scholar- ships and other programs, strengthens its 37 member colleges and universities, and advocates for the importance of minority education and college readiness. UNCF institutions and other historically black colleges and universities are highly effective, awarding 20 percent of African American baccalaureate degrees. UNCF administers more than 400


programs, including scholar- ship, internship and fellowship, mentoring, summer enrich- ment, and curriculum and faculty development programs. Today, UNCF supports more than 65,000 students at over 900 colleges and universities across the country. Its logo features the UNCF torch of leadership in education and its widely recognized motto, “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.”® Learn more at www. UNCF.org


reach their full potential.” Earlier this year, it was announced that Philadel- phia will receive $29 million in GEAR UP funds over a seven-year period. The new funding will support GEAR UP programs at 35 elemen- tary and middle schools in the School District of Phila- delphia. In addition, the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education will receive $22.1 million over the same period to support state-wide GEAR UP efforts. Congressman Fattah


recently announced that the National Council for Community and Education Partnerships (NCCEP) will hold its GEAR UP Capac- ity Building Conference in Philadelphia this coming February. The conference will bring as many as 1,200 practitioners, grantees, and educators to the city for a four-day workshop de- signed to strengthen GEAR UP programs in local com- munities across the nation. “It is fitting that our NC- CEP/GEAR UP Capacity Building Workshop will be returning to Philadelphia given the city’s central role in the creation of the nation- al program and its success as a GEAR UP grantee,” Monell said.


current as of September 30, 2014. The metropolitan area data


used to determine Peace Corps’ rankings are derived from the most current U.S. Census Bureau “Metropoli- tan and Micropolitan Statis- tical Area” data. Volunteers self-report their home city and state on their Peace Corps application.


Please frequent Philadelphia businesses.


Buying locally in a tough economy is one of the most important things we can each do to help one another.


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