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2014


WOMEN OF COLOR AWARD WINNERS STUDENT LEADERSHIP


She also belongs to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Bioengineering Division Student Leadership Committee. As part of the committee, she helps plan educational and social events for students. During 2013 and 2012, Ms. Knight was a teaching assistant. She gave weekly lectures, and held office hours to provide students with additional help.


TECHNICAL INNOVATION – INDUSTRY


Katrina Knight


National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow Department of Bioengineering University of Pittsburgh


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s. Katrina Knight is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in the department of bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She entered the graduate program with a Bachelor of Science in biochemistry from Claflin University. In spite of having a non-engineering degree, she completed the required engineering studies and acquired knowledge to excel academically and in the laboratory.


Ms. Knight’s hard work and dedication sets a positive example for students, and earns her recognition for her efforts. She received the K. Leroy Irvis Fellowship by the Engineering Office of Diversity, which provided financial support for her first year in the program. Soon after, she received the NIH T32 Biomechanics in Regenerative Medicine Training Grant, which supplied two years of financial support.


She excels in the classroom, and her talents outside of the classroom are commendable. Her various leadership roles and community outreach projects show how she wants to help others succeed.


Ms. Knight holds leadership positions in organizations on and off campus. She is an active member of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc., where she is also the advisor for the undergraduate chapter. She sets herself apart from other student advisors by being very involved with the undergrads that she advises. In spite of her busy schedule, she attends all bi-weekly meetings and educational sessions hosted by the sorority.


In addition to her activities with the sorority, Ms. Knight is vice president of the Engineering Diversity Graduate Student Association (EDGSA). EDGSA provides a community, particularly of minorities, that strives for unity, identity, and academic inclusive excellence. As vice president, she helps plan academic and social events. She is also responsible for organizing community outreach events.


52 WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2014


Dawnielle Farrar-Gaines, Ph.D. Senior Electrical and Materials Engineer Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory


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r. Dawnielle Farrar has built a successful 14-year career at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). Thanks to her strong research and leadership skills, she has made great contributions to the scientific community.


Her work on middle ear technologies to improve hearing restoration earned praise from her colleagues. Dr. Farrar’s management of the micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) electronics box and radiator project drew praise as well.


One of her most recognized projects is the fundamental materials science investigation into piezoelectric polymer fiber materials. Her thesis work on this subject at Johns Hopkins University resulted in a basic technological understanding of this subject. Following a successful collaboration with NASA Langley researchers, she gained grant funding to investigate the application of piezoelectric polymer fibers and fibrous sheet metals for noise reduction of aircraft engines.


Her outreach, educational and mentoring activities have succeeded in encouraging women of color to pursue careers in math, science and technology. Her membership in organizations such as the National Society of Black Engineers and Women in Engineering allows her to have a positive influence on many young minds.


www.womenofcolor.net


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