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WOMEN OF COLOR AWARD WINNERS women in high-level government positions.


APAT’s charter enhances engagement of African-American workforce members in career planning and development, and promotes career growth and developmental opportunities.


FEW works to end sex and gender discrimination and encourage diversity for inclusion and equity for women at work. In addition, Ms. Baker served as the past president for the local chapter at Fort Monmouth Blacks in Government (BIG) organization leading a membership of 68. BIG is an advocate of equal opportunity and professional development for black government employees in local, state and federal governments and others dedicated to justice for all. During her term as president, membership increased by 34 percent.


CAREER ACHIEVEMENT – GOVERNMENT


2014


engineer of SAS and architect of E-2D Advanced Hawkeye INCDS hardware. That position required her to lead multi- disciplined electrical, mechanical, reliability, safety, and test engineering teams through successful delivery six months ahead of first flight.


Her career achievements also include six patents. Out of the six, one is the first 17-inch ruggedized display for the all-glass cockpit of the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye NAVAIR aircraft. The display enables the pilot and co-pilot to read the same screen without contrast reversal or washout in ambient sunlight.


It is important to note that Dr. Saxena also performs a great deal of community service. She feels an obligation to inform others about the importance of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). She likes to interact with students of all ages, from elementary and high school, college/university, to advanced degrees. She believes the long-term success of technology in business depends on a continuous supply of diverse talent with degrees in the STEM fields.


Dr. Saxena has a bachelor’s with physics honors and a master’s in nuclear physics from Banaras Hindu University in India. She has a Ph.D. in quantum optics from Hyderabad University in India.


COLLEGE-LEVEL PROMOTION OF EDUCATION


Ragini Saxena, Ph.D. Manager, Sensor Engineering Northrop Grumman Corporation


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hile growing up in India, Dr. Ragina Saxena’s father encouraged her interest in math and science. She gladly nurtured her love of math and science, which was not a popular choice for females in India at that time. That little girl is grown now, and her love of math and science has allowed her to create a thriving career. Her career achievements prove she was destined to succeed as a scientist.


In 1988, Dr. Saxena began her career as a senior scientist and principal investigator with Rockwell Science Center. Technology development on Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, USAF and Office of Naval Research programs were her responsibility. She soon developed patented display designs used in Allen-Bradley’s Operator Interfaces, Collins ARC-210 radios, and Boeing 777 and 737 all-glass cockpits.


Dr. Saxena began her Northrop Grumman career in 2001. Her first position was working on Hollow Core Fiber as a senior technical advisor. She soon advanced to chief systems


www.womenofcolor.net


Serita Acker Director, Women in Science and Engineering Program Clemson University


T


rue. W.I.S.E. is an acronym for an academic initiative at Clemson University: It stands for Women in Science and Engineering at the College of Engineering and Science.


Yet, WISE also reflects the caliber of director Serita W. Acker, who set it in motion 15 years ago and continues to oversee a network of programs that lead college, high school and middle school students to pursue STEM degrees and careers.


Who has benefited from Ms. Acker’s vision? WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2014 31


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