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Richard Watters “Dickie” Small, continued


home?” Went up the stairs. He pushed himself up out of the bed and gave me a strong hug. He collapsed back in the bed. We chatted. T en, he mustered his forces and was up and out of the room and down the steps brewing up hot tea in the kitchen.


About his last visit to the doctor: “So, he checked me over, looked at my blood tests, told me I could leave.


‘Set


up your next monthly appointment with the receptionist,’ he said. I stood up to walk out. He continued to study my chart. ‘Oh,’ he said, as I got to the door, ‘on second thought,


don’t


bother.’ ” Dickie thought that


was hilarious. When Dickie analyzed his own illness that afternoon, he said it had to be Agent Orange that had taken away his health. “We were crawling through places that had


Quality,


been thick jungles and there wasn’t a leaf on a tree, crawling through the dirt, hiding in it, day after day,” he said. “No, I’m not going to make an issue of it. Some people have said why don’t I fi le a lawsuit. I don’t want to do that. It’d just make me bitter.”


A Glass Half Full Dickie gave to the


hundreds of apprentice riders and young horsemen whom he mentored. He gave to his family. He gave to the hard-working and talented Mexican men and women who became a part of his family. He gave his life to this country. “He was a guy who


always thought the glass was half full,” one might say.


This Cappy Jackson photo of Broad Brush was featured on the cover of the February 1988 Maryland Horse to celebrate his being named Maryland’s 1987 Horse of the Year.


If you knew him, you


knew that was wrong. T e glass was full, overfl owing, brimming and bubbling over.


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Gone too soon.... Richard Watters “Dickie” Small of Baltimore died on April 4 at the age of 68 after battling cancer. Small was a prominent Maryland trainer and conditioned the 1994 Breeders’ Cup Classic winner Concern as well as such racing greats as Caesar’s Wish (Maryland- bred Black-Eyed Susan and Mother Goose winner) and Broad Brush (Maryland’s all-time money winner at age four in 1987). Broad Brush  nished third in both the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes. Concern, a son of Broad Brush, won $2.5 million in his 1994 season alone.


Small attended the Gilman School and played lacrosse at the University of Delaware. He served two tours of duty in Vietnam as a Green Beret.


He became a licensed trainer in 1974, and Equibase lists him as having 1,119 wins earning $38.9 million. He won 36 graded stakes and continued to be actively involved with Maryland racing right up to his death. He was featured in the March 2014 Mid-Atlantic Thoroughbred for helping launch the careers of racing’s future generation including such female riders as Andrea Seefeldt, Jerilyn Brown, Rosie Napravnik and Forest Boyce.


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