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Leadership Vol. 42, No. 1 • September/October 2012 Features


8 Lift-off to the Common Core Here are five steps educators can take to help students become independent, literate learners in content areas. By Sue Kaiser and Greg Kaiser


Columns


7 To our readers 21st century schools: Learning and teaching in the classroom and beyond.


By David Gomez


23 Creating experiences where critical thinking


happens Our new accountability system should be based on the ability to synthesize skills and apply them to solve real problems. By George Manthey


12 Diving into real world challenges Bridging the disconnect between the classroom and the real world brings learning alive, as this marine robotics program demonstrates.


By Matt Saldaña and Leslie Rodden


14 A quiet transformation Stress not only contributes to violence and behavior issues, it impacts focus and memory, fundamentally impairing a child’s ability to learn and make good decisions.


By James S. Dierke


18 Maintaining high challenge and high support for diverse learners A combination of nurturing and rigor is essential to educating California’s diverse student population, but targeted supports are also needed to help students meet achieve- ment goals.


By Steven Athanases


24 Top 10 instructional strategies for struggling students These tools can help schools leverage familiar instructional strategies in new ways that support all students and become habits within the school culture.


By John Carr and Sharen Bertrando


28 Court schools: Embracing a culture of learning Court schools have stepped up to the challenge of providing safe and secure classrooms while offering rigorous academic instruction.


By Paul A. Garcia, Kathryn Catania and Sam Nofziger


32 Alternatives to student suspension The Education Code provides a full range of disciplinary tools educators can use to find the ideal response to individual cases of student misconduct.


By David Robinet t


September/October 2012


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