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ence or social studies, the teacher models the strategies that may have been presented in the language arts portion of the day. Stu- dents soon discover that the strategies work with every book, not just the English/lan- guage arts book.


Knowledge is power As we prepare for Common Core Stan-


dards implementation, we truly have noth- ing to fear. Knowledge is power, and we have the knowledge to make a difference in every classroom for every student. The Common Core Standards demands are rigorous. This


from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc.


Schmoker, M. (2011). Focus elevating the essentials to radically improve student learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Devel- opment.


Strauss, V. (April 5, 2010). Willingham: What NAEP reading scores really show. [Web log post]. Retrieved from http:// voices.washingtonpost.com/answer-


sheet/daniel-willingham/willingham- misunderstanding-na.html#more.


Sue Kaiser is director of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment for the Hacienda La Puente


USD and serves as president of the Curriculum, Instruction and Accountability Council for state ACSA. Greg Kaiser is chair of the Teacher


Education Department at Azusa Pacific University.


statement has been heralded in the news and in professional journals, but it does not help us to change practice or to get ready for the next generation in our profession. Under- standing our deficits and developing sound, evidence-based practices to close our “prac- tice gaps” will help us to get ready for “lift off” with the Common Core. n


References


Cunningham, A.E. & Stanovich, K.E. (1998). “What reading does for the mind.” Amer- ican Educator, 22(1&2), 8-15.


Kamil, M.L.; Borman, G.D.; Dole, J.; Kral, C.C.; Salinger, T. & Torgesen, J. (2008). Improving adolescent literacy: Effective classroom and intervention practices: A Practice Guide (NCEE #2008-4027). Washington, D.C.: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional As- sistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved


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