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Other Identifi cation Methods With several other methods of identifi cation available, how does eyeD compare? While many breed registries in Europe now require microchipping to store identifi cation, pedigree and competition records, it is still optional in the U.S.; and there is not yet one standardized global database that stores the microchip information. There is also the risk of the horse contracting an infection at the site of injection if done poorly, as well as the possibility of the chip being removed later in life. Paper passports are easily forged and easily destroyed, and branding can be painful and stressful. The Universal Equine Life Number (UELN) identifi es only horses registered with certain breed organizations, and does not yet have a standardized worldwide database. eyeD is completely non-invasive and permanent, eliminating the risk of infection, the stress factor and the loss of information. (For more information on other identifi cation methods, see Warmbloods Today Sep/Oct 2011 issue, “Uncovering Your Horse’s True Identity.”) However, no system is perfect. In order for the horse to


be identifi ed by its eyeD identifi cation number, a scanner must be present. Still a new technology, the biggest drawback is that there is no guarantee that a scanner will be handy to scan and identify the animal. At least with methods such as branding and tattooing, the mark is visible and can be traced. Currently, the eyeD system is only being used at select clinics in America, but with a marketing and sales team in place in Canada and Europe, eyeD is looking to expand into the global market.


Who is using the eyeD system? Currently, veterinary hospitals and practices are the leading users of the eyeD system, with hospitals such as Rood & Riddle, Hagyard Equine Medical Institute and Tennessee Equine Hospital acting as early adopters of this revolutionary technology. Equine rescues, such as Colorado Horse Rescue, are also starting to utilize this technology to help with data management and tracking the horse over time. Though there are currently no breed registries utilizing this technology, eyeD is working towards implementing such programs with various breed registries and stud books. To enroll a horse, he should be at least 10 to 12 months


old. The owner signs up via the eyeD website, enters basic information about the horse, and then schedules an appointment with the veterinarian. Enrollment in the program costs $50, with an annual renewal fee of less than $2 per year (a discounted fee for Futurity members). For more information on the eyeD system, contact your vet or visit the eyeD website at www.eyed.com.


Warmbloods Today 71


Sometimes you take care of him.


Sometimes he takes care of you. We’ll take care of the rest.


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