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the CWHBA’s VISIONOF


together we would never overcome the geographic and demographic challenges we confronted. T e second thing that was recognized by that early group was that Warmblood horses, as a breed, were based on international pedigrees, but registered by place of birth. Successful breed societies were geographically based. T e vision of a national Warmblood society, that followed the European methodology and pedigrees,


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provided a full range of services and adhered to international standards, resulted in the incorporation of the Canadian Warmblood Horse Breeders Association (CWHBA) in 1991. T rough commitment and hard work the CWHBA is fulfi lling this vision and has taken its place along side other national and state registries, such as the Swedish Warmblood Society and Hanoverian Society, as a full and active member of the World Breeding Federation for Sport Horses (WBFSH). Today the CWHBA is looking toward the future by


working closely with the WBFSH and the InterStallion committee to keep abreast of trends and developments in Warmblood breeding. One important initiative, as part of a larger strategic plan, is a review of the breeding program and evaluation system. Along side a number of European stud books, the CWHBA is looking at ways to improve evaluation and testing of interior characteristics. T is is becoming critical as the demographics of the industry change due to increased use by older riders. Disposition, temperament, rideability and trainability are more important than ever. T e trend to specialized breeding has sparked a need


for more accurate scoring methods, and the CWHBA is participating in international discussions aimed at creating a universal linear scoring tool that would help breeders better defi ne the genetic characteristics of our breeding population.


In the midst of this, Canadian


breeders recognize that what makes the Canadian Warmblood horse special is our ideal growing conditions. Pasture- raising in larger groups and growing up in a natural way results in horses that are sound and sane. Properly socialized, Canadian-bred horses have good minds and are accustomed to the outdoor environment. Freedom to move, coupled with appropriate stress at the right times, produces strong bones and tendons and a legacy for long-term soundness. T e vision of Canadian riders


winning on Canadian Warmbloods begins with a vision of horses well cared for and raised with all the benefi ts of the vast Canadian landscape.


Top: The dressage horse Alero, sold at the 2006 auction to Christina Tann of Snohomish, WA. Middle: Graphiti W ridden by Michele Hinrichs. Bottom: Mares and foals at Touchstone Farm in Alberta.


52 September/October 2012 THE FUTURE


n 1988 a small group of visionary Warmblood breeders gathered in Olds, Alberta to discuss the future of Warmblood horse breeding in Canada. T e European system of national Warmblood registries was just beginning to be understood. What was clear was that unless Canadians worked


Photo by Carolynn Bunch


Photo by P. Ozhram


Photo by Vanessa Latford


Canadian Warmblood Horse Breeders’ Association


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